ICAO Statement : GERMANWINGS FLIGHT 9525

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The International Civil Aviation Organization (ICAO) extends its profound sympathies to the families of the passengers and crew who were so tragically lost in Germanwings Flight 9525.

ICAO supports the internationally‐recognized approach whereby a completed accident investigation will   officially determine the causes and contributing factors of the accident, and concurrently provide safety recommendations on appropriate preventative measures to avoid recurrences, as well as guidelines for future consideration by ICAO, States and airlines.  

ICAO has developed international standards and recommended practices on the security of flight crew compartments which are presently contained in the following Annexes to the Convention on International Civil Aviation (Chicago Convention):

  • Annex 6—Operation of Aircraft
  • Annex 8—Airworthiness of Aircraft
  • Annex 17—Security  

The relevant sections of Annexes 6, 8, and 17 are attached to this statement for further reference.  

Annex 1 – Personnel Licensing requires that all airline pilots undergo a periodic medical examination   (by a doctor who is trained in aviation medicine) that includes both a physical and a mental assessment. If there is any concern from this medical screening then a further, more specialized, assessment can be undertaken that may include neuropsychological testing. Pilots also undergo periodic simulator checks as well as checks of performance during routine operations.   

For more information please contact: communications@icao.int 

 

CHAPTER 13. SECURITY*

13.1 Domestic commercial operations Recommendation.

— International Standards and Recommended Practices set forth in this Chapter should be applied by all Contracting States also in case of domestic commercial operations (air services).

13.2 Security of the flight crew compartment

13.2.1 In all aeroplanes which are equipped with a flight crew compartment door, this door shall be capable of being locked, and means shall be provided by which cabin crew can discreetly notify the flight crew in the event of suspicious activity or security breaches in the cabin.

13.2.2 From 1 November 2003, all passenger-carrying aeroplanes of a maximum certificated take-off mass in excess of 45 500 kg or with a passenger seating capacity greater than 60 shall be equipped with an approved flight crew compartment door that is designed to resist penetration by small arms fire and grenade shrapnel, and to resist forcible intrusions by unauthorized persons. This door shall be capable of being locked and unlocked from either pilot’s station.

13.2.3 In all aeroplanes which are equipped with a flight crew compartment door in accordance with 13.2.2:

a) this door shall be closed and locked from the time all external doors are closed following embarkation until any such door is opened for disembarkation, except when necessary to permit access and egress by authorized persons; and

b) means shall be provided for monitoring from either pilot’s station the entire door area outside the flight crew compartment to identify persons requesting entry and to detect suspicious behaviour or potential threat.

13.2.4 Recommendation.— All passenger-carrying aeroplanes should be equipped with an approved flight crew compartment door, where practicable, that is designed to resist penetration by small arms fire and grenade shrapnel, and to resist forcible intrusions by unauthorized persons. This door should be capable of being locked and unlocked from either pilot’s station.

13.2.5 Recommendation.— In all aeroplanes which are equipped with a flight crew compartment door in accordance with 13.2.4:

a) the door should be closed and locked from the time all external doors are closed following embarkation until any such door is opened for disembarkation, except when necessary to permit access and egress by authorized persons; and

b) means should be provided for monitoring from either pilot’s station the entire door area outside the flight crew compartment to identify persons requesting entry and to detect suspicious behaviour or potential threat.

* In the context of this Chapter, the word “security” is used in the sense of prevention of illicit acts against civil aviation.

 

CHAPTER 10. SECURITY

10.1 Aeroplanes used for domestic commercial operations

Recommendation.— International Standards and Recommended Practices set forth in this chapter should be applied by all Contracting States for aeroplanes engaged in domestic commercial operations (air services).

10.2 Least-risk bomb location

For aeroplanes of a maximum certificated take-off mass in excess of 45 500 kg or with a passenger seating capacity greater than 60, consideration shall be given during the design of the aeroplane to the provision of a least-risk bomb location so as to minimize the effects of a bomb on the aeroplane and its occupants.

10.3 Protection of the flight crew compartment

10.3.1 In all aeroplanes, which are required by Annex 6, Part I, Chapter 13 to have an approved flight crew compartment door, and for which an application for the issue of a Type Certificate is first submitted to the appropriate national authority on or after 20 May 2006, the flight crew compartment bulkheads, floors and ceilings shall be designed to resist penetration by small arms fire and grenade shrapnel and to resist forcible intrusions, if these areas are accessible in flight to passengers and cabin crew.

10.3.2 Recommendation.— In all aeroplanes, which are required by Annex 6, Part I, Chapter 13 to have an approved flight crew compartment door, and for which an application for amending the Type Certificate to include a derivative type design is submitted to the appropriate national authority on or after 20 May 2006, consideration should be given to reinforcing the flight crew compartment bulkheads, floors and ceilings so as to resist penetration by small arms fire and grenade shrapnel and to resist forcible intrusions, if these areas are accessible in flight to passengers and cabin crew.

Note.— Standards and Recommended Practices concerning the requirements for the flight crew compartment door in all commercial passenger-carrying aeroplanes are contained in Annex 6, Part I, Chapter 13.

10.4 Interior design

For aeroplanes of a maximum certificated take-off mass in excess of 45 500 kg or with a passenger seating capacity greater than 60, consideration shall be given to design features that will deter the easy concealment of weapons, explosives or other dangerous objects on board aircraft and that will facilitate search procedures for such objects.

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Annex 17 — Security Chapter 4

4.3 Measures relating to aircraft

4.3.1 Each Contracting State shall ensure that aircraft security checks of originating aircraft engaged in commercial air transport movements are performed or an aircraft security search is carried out. The determination of whether it is an aircraft security check or a search that is appropriate shall be based upon a security risk assessment carried out by the relevant national authorities.

4.3.2 Each Contracting State shall ensure that measures are taken to ensure that any items left behind by passengers disembarking from transit flights are removed from the aircraft or otherwise dealt with appropriately before departure of an aircraft engaged in commercial flights.

4.3.3 Each Contracting State shall require its commercial air transport operators to take measures as appropriate to ensure that during flight unauthorized persons are prevented from entering the flight crew compartment.

Note.— Provisions for security of the flight crew compartment of aircraft engaged in commercial air transportation are contained in Annex 6, Part I, Chapter 13, Section 13.2.

4.3.4 Each Contracting State shall ensure that an aircraft subject to 4.3.1 is protected from unauthorized interference from the time the aircraft search or check has commenced until the aircraft departs.

4.3.5 Recommendation.— Each Contracting State should ensure that security controls are established to prevent acts of unlawful interference with aircraft when they are not in security restricted areas.

4.4 Measures relating to passengers and their cabin baggage

4.4.1 Each Contracting State shall establish measures to ensure that originating passengers of commercial air transport operations and their cabin baggage are screened prior to boarding an aircraft departing from a security restricted area.

4.4.2 Each Contracting State shall ensure that transfer passengers of commercial air transport operations and their cabin baggage are screened prior to boarding an aircraft, unless it has established a validation process and continuously implements procedures, in collaboration with the other Contracting State where appropriate, to ensure that such passengers and their cabin baggage have been screened to an appropriate level at the point of origin and subsequently protected from unauthorized interference from the point of screening at the originating airport to the departing aircraft at the transfer airport.

Note.— Guidance material on this issue can be found in the Aviation Security Manual (Doc 8973 — Restricted).

4.4.3 Each Contracting State shall ensure that passengers and their cabin baggage which have been screened are protected from unauthorized interference from the point of screening until they board their aircraft. If mixing or contact does take place, the passengers concerned and their cabin baggage shall be re-screened before boarding an aircraft.

4.4.4 Each Contracting State shall establish at an airport measures for transit operations to protect transit passengers’ cabin baggage from unauthorized interference and protect the integrity of the security of the airport of transit.

4.4.5 Recommendation.— Each Contracting State should ensure that practices are established at airports and on board aircraft to assist in the identification and resolution of suspicious activity that may pose a threat to civil aviation.

4.5 Measures relating to hold baggage

4.5.1 Each Contracting State shall establish measures to ensure that originating hold baggage is screened prior to being loaded onto an aircraft engaged in commercial air transport operations departing from a security restricted area.

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