The Trump administration and aviation

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Re: The Trump administration and aviation

Post by sn26567 » 06 Jun 2017, 23:10

US President Donald Trump outlined a plan to privatise the US ATC system (under control of the airlines) to modernise it and lower flying costs, but his proposal drew immediate criticism over handing control of a key asset to special interests and big airlines.
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Re: The Trump administration and aviation

Post by sn26567 » 12 Jun 2017, 22:12

Trump’s travel ban blocked again by US judiciary

The block on US President Donald Trump’s revised executive order temporarily banning nationals from six countries from travelling to the US has been upheld by a second US federal appeals court.

The San Francisco-based Ninth Circuit Court of Appeals ruled June 12 that Trump had exceeded his authority and that it was “reasonable” to conclude the president was seeking “to disfavour a particular religion.”

http://atwonline.com/security/trump-s-t ... -judiciary

The funny thing is that the court used a tweet of Trump to justify its decision :)
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Re: The Trump administration and aviation

Post by sn26567 » 13 Jun 2017, 14:42

Trump weighing new limits on Cuba travel

U.S. President Donald Trump plans to scale back his predecessor’s effort to open Cuba to U.S. tourism, and his advisers are preparing options including new limits on American travel to the island.

Final options haven’t yet been presented to Trump, though a decision is expected before a visit by the U.S. president to Miami on Friday.

Trump has criticised Obama’s deal-making with Cuba as one-sided, and has said it allowed the Castro regime to continue human rights abuses. Obama re-opened the U.S. embassy on the island, relaxed travel restrictions on American citizens, and allowed U.S. airlines to establish direct flights and U.S. cruise lines to make ports of call in Cuba.

http://travelwirenews.com/trump-weighin ... ns-147656/

I am not sure the U.S. airlines will be amused....
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Re: The Trump administration and aviation

Post by sn26567 » 26 Jun 2017, 18:54

sn26567 wrote:
12 Jun 2017, 22:12
Trump’s travel ban blocked again by US judiciary
The U.S. Supreme Court partially lifts the injunction against the Trump travel ban: citizens from the 6 countries aimed by the travel ban will not be allowed into the U.S., except if they have a bona fide relation with the U.S.: parents living in the U.S., acceptance in a U.S. school, etc.
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Re: The Trump administration and aviation

Post by sn26567 » 04 Aug 2017, 16:30

Passenger wrote:
07 Dec 2016, 13:32
sn26567 wrote:Boeing shares fall slightly today after President-elect Trump says that the order for new Boeing Air Force One (two 747-8i aircraft) should be cancelled...
... should be cancelled unless Boeing makes them cheaper because the price tag is becoming too expensive, Trump said. "We want Boeing to make money, but not like this" - Trump said.
Trump wanted a cheaper Air Force One. So the USAF is buying a bankrupt Russian firm’s undelivered 747s

President Donald Trump said the projected cost of new Air Force One aircraft was too high, so the U.S. Air Force found a way to lower it: by buying a pair of Boeing 747 jetliners abandoned by a bankrupt Russian airline.

Air Force officials are now finalizing a contract with Boeing for the two planes, according to three defense officials with knowledge of the deal. The Pentagon could publicly announce the deal as soon as this week.

"We're working through the final stages of coordination to purchase two commercial 747-8 aircraft and expect to award a contract soon," Air Force spokeswoman Ann Stefanek said in a statement.

The Air Force is not expected to disclose the specific value of the contract, but officials said that the military is getting a good deal on the planes. Boeing lists the average sticker price of a 747-8 as $386.8 million; the actual amount paid by airlines and other customers varies with quantities, configurations, and so forth.

We’re still working toward a deal to provide two 747-8s to the Air Force — this deal is focused on providing a great value for the Air Force and the best price for the taxpayer,” Boeing spokeswoman Caroline Hutcheson said in a statement.

The 747s that will be transformed for Presidential transport were originally ordered in 2013 by Transaero, which was Russia’s second-largest airline until it went bankrupt in 2015. Boeing built two of the four jets in the order, but the airline never took ownership of them.

Typically, an airline makes a 1 percent down payment when it orders a plane, then pays the balance in installments. Transaero did not fulfill its scheduled payments, according to an industry source.

Aeroflot absorbed most of Transaero’s existing fleet, but declined to pick up Transaero’s 747-8I orders worth $1.5 billion at list prices,” FlightGlobal reported last month.

So Boeing flight-tested the two completed jets and put them in storage. Flight tracking data shows that the aircraft, numbered N894BA and N895BA, were last flown in February, to the Southern California Logistics Airport in Victorville, a sprawling facility in the Mojave Desert whose hot, dry air prevents corrosion. This “boneyard” is largely occupied by retired commercial jets that still bear the liveries of Delta, FedEx, British Airways, and Cathay Pacific. Other planes, unmarked, sit with their engines shrinkwrapped in anticipation of one day returning to flight.

Boeing has been paying to store the two 747s in new condition while searching for a buyer, which allowed the Air Force to negotiate a good deal for them, sources said. It’s similar to the way car dealers discount new vehicles from the previous year when new models hit the lot.

Turning a standard 747 into a flying White House requires more than a blue-and-white paint job. After the Air Force takes ownership of the planes, contractors will give them a state-of-the-art communications system, defensive countermeasures, and hardening to withstand an electromagnetic pulse caused by a nuclear explosion. New custom interiors will have conference rooms, offices and seating for White House staff, guests and journalists.

The Pentagon’s 2018 budget request, sent to Congress in February, shows that the Air Force plans to spend nearly $3.2 billion between 2018 and 2022 on two new Air Force One jets. Trump would likely fly on the new planes if he is elected to a second term.

The 747s currently flown as Air Force One are 747-200s, older models that started flying presidents in the early 1990s.

Source: Government Executive
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Re: The Trump administration and aviation

Post by sn26567 » 05 Dec 2017, 22:27

The US Supreme Court has ruled to allow President Trump’s latest travel ban to go into full effect, meaning the country can deny visitors from Chad, Iran, Libya, Somalia, Syria and Yemen.

And not Saudi Arabia? The 19 people responsible for the 3000 deaths on 9/11 came from that country...
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Re: The Trump administration and aviation

Post by sn26567 » 19 Feb 2018, 11:10

Trump tax reform to spur competition on transatlantic routes

US President Donald Trump's tax reforms could shake up the transatlantic air-travel market in the mid- to long-term by giving US carriers some extra lift in a lucrative segment where competition with European and Middle East rivals is increasingly fierce.

"Tax cuts and investment stimulus might be a game changer in the mid- to long-term," says Sebastian Zank, director at Scope Ratings.

The three large US carriers together generate more than USD 15bn per annum on transatlantic routes. For the U.S. carriers, these flights are responsible for 15% to 20% of revenue, similar to European rivals or 70% for niche player Virgin Atlantic.

The Trump reforms now promise a double boost for the US sector, at least in the medium term.

The corporate tax cut promises significant theoretical savings. For Delta, American Airlines and United, plus the domestically focused Southwest, Scope estimates the amount at around $500m to $1bn a year. In the short-term, only smaller US carriers will benefit, as the three carriers with intercontinental routes have carried forward tax losses.

Secondly, Trump's investment-friendly reforms are particularly attractive for companies which spend large sums on big-ticket items like passenger aircraft. Aircraft purchases can now be expensed immediately rather than depreciated over several years.

Delta, AA and United could use the tax benefits to enhance their transatlantic market position in two ways: Cut fares and buy new planes.

While a near-term transatlantic price war isn't likely as the full benefit of the tax cuts will kick in after existing net operating loss carryforwards have been used, having more room to lower fares could be a welcome longer-term boost for the US airlines. They face new no-frills, low-price competitors such as Norwegian, WOW and Air Europa, as well as hybrid operators like Air France's Joon, IAG's LEVEL and Lufthansa’s Eurowings.

The US carriers also need new aircraft. “Long-haul US airlines also have among the oldest fleets after years of eschewing heavy investment in new planes, certainly relative to many foreign rivals. They now have more leeway to upgrade their fleets with more economical and comfortable jets,” says Zank.

Any loss of competitiveness for European airlines--in terms of transatlantic market share, shrinking load factors, or thinner margins--could put pressure on their own balance sheets.

Even if US carriers opt instead for more generous cash returns to shareholders, the sector looks better braced for future shocks, such as spikes in oil prices. For that reason alone, Trump's fiscal reforms hold the promise of clearer skies for a notoriously turbulent part of the US economy.

DOWNLOAD THE FULL REPORT

This is a contribution from Scope Ratings GmbH and does not represent my own opinion (s) sn26567
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Re: The Trump administration and aviation

Post by sn26567 » 26 Feb 2018, 17:55

According to the Washington Post (which Trump considers as fake news), Trump's personal 757 pilot is among the candidates to replace FAA administrator. Nice promotion...
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Re: The Trump administration and aviation

Post by sn26567 » 04 Apr 2018, 23:09

The commercial war launched by Trump on China could have consequences on aviation.

First, the Trump administration imposed tariffs of 25% on steel and 10% on aluminium.

China retaliated by imposing tariffs of 15% on 120 American products and 25% on 8 more products, most notably fruit and pork.

Next, the US proposed more tariffs, which this time include aviation parts: it unveiled an extended list of Chinese products that, if approved, will be subject to US$50 billion in import tariffs. The list includes “parts of airplanes and other aircraft, propellers and rotors and parts thereof”. Any C919 and ARJ21 imports are also on the list.

Not to be let alone, China proposed first a tariff on all aeroplanes of less than 45 tonnes (thus sparing Boeing), but later included the Boeing 737 MAX in its proposals.

The big winner of a commercial war between the US and China will be Airbus!

Boeing has long benefited from the Trump protectionist policies, but must be less happy now...

https://www.aviation24.be/manufacturers/ ... rosperity/
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Re: The Trump administration and aviation

Post by Passenger » 05 Apr 2018, 15:02

sn26567 wrote:
04 Apr 2018, 23:09
The commercial war launched by Trump on China could have consequences on aviation.

First, the Trump administration imposed tariffs of 25% on steel and 10% on aluminium.

China retaliated by imposing tariffs of 15% on 120 American products and 25% on 8 more products, most notably fruit and pork.

Next, the US proposed more tariffs, which this time include aviation parts: it unveiled an extended list of Chinese products that, if approved, will be subject to US$50 billion in import tariffs. The list includes “parts of airplanes and other aircraft, propellers and rotors and parts thereof”. Any C919 and ARJ21 imports are also on the list.

Not to be let alone, China proposed first a tariff on all aeroplanes of less than 45 tonnes (thus sparing Boeing), but later included the Boeing 737 MAX in its proposals.

The big winner of a commercial war between the US and China will be Airbus!

Boeing has long benefited from the Trump protectionist policies, but must be less happy now...

https://www.aviation24.be/manufacturers/ ... rosperity/
For 2017, the trade deficit between the USA and China is 375.227.500.000 USD. That's very abnormal, and can only be explained as dumping of Chinese goods onto the US market.
https://www.census.gov/foreign-trade/balance/c5700.html

Yes, Airbus will now probably "sell" more aircraft in China then Boeing. Bur for leased aircraft, I don't think that an import duty tax applies.

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Re: The Trump administration and aviation

Post by sn26567 » 09 May 2018, 14:28

Trump does it again: he exits the nuclear deal on Iran. Thus, the US government plans to seek to reimpose sanctions on Iran, leaving little hope that Boeing and Airbus will be able to consummate US$40 billion in aircraft deals struck by Iranian carriers during the brief trade thaw. Both companies’ export licenses to Iran will be revoked. Thank you, Mr Trump!
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Re: The Trump administration and aviation

Post by FLYAIR10 » 09 May 2018, 15:55

Trump does it again: he exits the nuclear deal on Iran. Thus, the US government plans to seek to reimpose sanctions on Iran, leaving little hope that Boeing and Airbus will be able to consummate US$40 billion in aircraft deals struck by Iranian carriers during the brief trade thaw. Both companies’ export licenses to Iran will be revoked. Thank you, Mr Trump!
And what impact does the Trump decision have on Airbus-sales to Iran? Airbus-planes have a lot of US components. Tightened US-sanctions will also block Airbus-sales and deliveries then? Or are there Airbus-variants which are completely 'non-US'?

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Re: The Trump administration and aviation

Post by jan_olieslagers » 09 May 2018, 16:05

To remain on topic, more or less: as André stated above, both Boeing and Airbus will loose sales. Their market share must go to Russian or Chinese suppliers, or perhaps to newcomers like India, Brasil. But Iran will loose income thus loosing buying power, making the gain for these newcomers rather small.

And is this not an opportunity for alternative suppliers - from Europe to begin with! - to offer alternative products for those components Airbus currently sources from the US?

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Re: The Trump administration and aviation

Post by Passenger » 09 May 2018, 16:58

jan_olieslagers wrote:
09 May 2018, 16:37
Hm. More politics? Luchtzak tower? It is obviously impossible to entirely disregard politics when discussing this matter, but shouldn't aviation be the focus?
There is no forum rule that forbits politics:
viewtopic.php?f=2&t=2760

A topic "The Trump administration and aviation" is quite obviously more about politics then about aviation.

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Re: The Trump administration and aviation

Post by luchtzak » 09 May 2018, 17:53

Locked for clean-up. :roll:

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Re: The Trump administration and aviation

Post by sn26567 » 09 May 2018, 18:09

Unlocked after clean-up. Please stick to aviation!

To reply some questions: yes, the US can block Airbus sales because of the huge US contents in their planes.
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Re: The Trump administration and aviation

Post by cathay belgium » 09 May 2018, 21:06

Hi,

On topic for avgeek, B727,A310,A300,B743,F100 Will see another 10 years of flying in Iran Avgeek Walhalla ,!

What about thé already delivered A321, A330 ?
Soon in the desert due lack of spares ?

Trump is a dumb ass and a killer itself keeping a whole country away of modern safe planes !
Disgusting !

The only good thing of Trump is the lower dollar and the imment stronger united feelings for a More europe,...

CXB
Last edited by cathay belgium on 10 May 2018, 08:58, edited 1 time in total.
New types planned for 2019 : A223
New types flown : AN24,AW139,B737MAX8,B763nonER,EMB110 Bandeirante, Shorts360,Autogire MTOsport2010

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Re: The Trump administration and aviation

Post by jan_olieslagers » 09 May 2018, 21:11

the US can block Airbus sales because of the huge US contents in their planes.
They can, today. But how essential are these US-sourced components? How soon could alternatives be available? US would then of course do all they can to avoid these alternate parts getting certified, but there must be an end to that, too.

Actually, what parts are we talking about? Engines can be Rolls-Royce/SNECMA, I think? Avionics/electronics. perhaps?
Last edited by jan_olieslagers on 09 May 2018, 21:33, edited 1 time in total.

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Re: The Trump administration and aviation

Post by convair » 09 May 2018, 21:31

cathay belgium wrote:
09 May 2018, 21:06
Hi,

On topic for avgeek, B727,A310,A300,B743,F100 Will see another 10 years of flying in Iran Avgeek Walhalla ,!

What about thé already delivered A321, A330 ?
Soon in thé desert due lack of spares ?

Trump is a dumb ass and a killer itself keeping a while country away of modern safe planes !
Disgusting !

Thé only good thing of Trump is thé lower dollar and thé imment stronger united feelings for a More europe,...

CXB
Couldn"t they lease aircraft from european companies?

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Re: The Trump administration and aviation

Post by sn26567 » 09 May 2018, 23:16

sn26567 wrote:
09 May 2018, 14:28
Thus, the US government plans to seek to reimpose sanctions on Iran, leaving little hope that Boeing and Airbus will be able to consummate US$40 billion in aircraft deals struck by Iranian carriers during the brief trade thaw. Both companies’ export licenses to Iran will be revoked.
Iran was an attractive market because of its old fleet that could not be modernised under the international sanctions. The Wall Street Journal gives some details about the orders that will be cancelled.

https://www.wsj.com/articles/boeing-air ... 1525877490

Airbus had delivered three of its 100 planes ordered by Iran Air before the U.S. decision. No Boeing planes have gone to Iran under contracts announced with Iran Air and Iran Aseman Airlines. ATR said it had delivered eight of 20 planes Iran Air ordered.

Options to source planes from other makers are limited, though, because U.S. parts are incorporated by Brazilian, Canadian, Russian and Chinese plane makers.
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