Impact of the coronavirus crisis on aviation

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Passenger
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Re: Impact of the coronavirus crisis on aviation

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Passenger wrote: 03 Nov 2020, 11:46 At 19h tonight, the Dutch government will announce a further lockdown.
Main stream media expect a negative travel advisory for the Christmas holiday season.
Dutch government: "Do not travel - do not book a trip before mid January":
https://www.rijksoverheid.nl/actueel/ni ... e-lockdown

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Re: Impact of the coronavirus crisis on aviation

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Daily review:

Air Canada Rouge returned to the skies with a flight from Toronto to Cancun.

British Airways A380s are likely to be grounded until at least early 2021 in the wake of a sweeping travel ban imposed by the latest UK lockdown.

Hawaiian Airlines flights between Honolulu and Pago Pago are suspended for an additional 30-days, through 30 December 2020.

Interjet cancelled all its flights for a second straight day because it was unable to pay for fuel. Flights expected to resume today, but their website is still down.

Lufthansa major shareholder Heinz Hermann Thiele fears that the restructuring negotiations with the trade unions will fail and therefore wants the federal government as an intermediary.

Norwegian is reported to be losing up to US$52 million per month, and is now looking for more capital to prevent it from running out of cash in a few months. The carrier is seeking funds to make to summer 2022.
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Re: Impact of the coronavirus crisis on aviation

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Daily review:

Air Europa obtained government approval for a €475 million state aid package, consisting of an equity-backed loan and regular loan. The carrier will have a maximum of six years to repay the loans. In return, the government will have a say on Air Europa’s potential sale to IAG (UK).

Air Transat is suspending its flights to and from Western Canada until February 2021 due to weak demand.

Germany’s federal government wants to help the ailing aviation industry with further funding up to €1 billion, especially for airports.

Venezuela gave the green light for a very partial resumption of commercial flights, after a suspension of nearly eight months due to the pandemi . Authorities did not say when the first flights were scheduled.
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Re: Impact of the coronavirus crisis on aviation

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Passenger wrote: 03 Nov 2020, 20:38
Passenger wrote: 03 Nov 2020, 11:46 At 19h tonight, the Dutch government will announce a further lockdown.
Main stream media expect a negative travel advisory for the Christmas holiday season.
Dutch government: "Do not travel - do not book a trip before mid January":
https://www.rijksoverheid.nl/actueel/ni ... e-lockdown
The Dutch travel trade reports a huge raise today in interest for travel to the Caribbean Netherlands. Reason is quite obvious: the official travel advisory ban excludes that region. Travel out of the Netherlands is thus allowed to Aruba, Curaçao and Sint Maarten, and to Bonaire, Sint Eustatius en Saba. On condition that they remain code green or code yellow. With code orange, a 10-*days quarantaine back home is compulsary.

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Re: Impact of the coronavirus crisis on aviation

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Daily review (for yesterday, as I wasn't available, and today):

Aeromexico has requested permission from US bankruptcy court to dismiss 1,830 employees in a cost-saving measure to weather the economic shocks of the crisis.

American Airlines is mulling adding freighters as cargo continues to become more important. American cuts 100,000 flights in December 2020 due to low demand.

British Airways will reportedly suspend all flights from the London Gatwick and furlough “many more” staff as new lockdown measures take effect. Also, British Airways won’t be returning to Sydney until sometime in 2021, due to travel bans in both the UK and Australia.

Cathay Pacific pilots and more than 90% of its cabin crew have signed new, cheaper employment take-it-or-leave-it contracts.

EasyJet is talking to the German government about financial aid, but did not disclose specific amounts. In other news, EasyJet announces the sale/leaseback of a further eleven aircraft with two counterparties. The transactions generate total cash proceeds of US$169.5 million. Ten A320 family aircraft were sold to ACS Aero 2 Beta (Ireland) and will be leased back for an average term of 58 months. Also, the carrier sold one A320 family aircraft to JLPS Holding Ireland. EasyJet now expects to fly no more than 20% of planned capacity over the next three months due to stricter travel restrictions across Europe.

Flyest (Argentina) filed for bankruptcy on 21 October 2020, as its operation became unsustainable after more than seven months on the ground. The AOC was also suspended.

Wizz Air CEO Jozsef Varadi says the world will have a smaller airline industry as a result of the crisis with many privately funded carriers set to go under and governments throwing “good money after bad” to keep national champions afloat. Wizz aims to widen a gap in unit costs thanks to regular deliveries of new Airbus aircraft. Wizz Air is positioning itself for an expected recovery in air travel in spring 2021, buoyed by its cash-rich position which should see it through a tough winter. Wizz expects to fly 30% to 50% of last year’s capacity over the winter period.

Canada is finally close to an aid package for airlines that will likely offer low-interest loans to carriers versus taking outright stakes, eight months after the pandemic decimated air travel.
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Re: Impact of the coronavirus crisis on aviation

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"Once there is a vaccine, we'll fly again": free article by Het Laatste Nieuws:
https://www.hln.be/economie/zodra-er-va ... ~a7d25502/
(In Dutch, so use the translation option from your internet browser)

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Re: Impact of the coronavirus crisis on aviation

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Passenger wrote: 02 Nov 2020, 10:27 Flemish newspaper HLN online:
https://www.hln.be/zaventem/van-corona- ... ~a2feb0cc/

Brussels Airport, your excuse is nonsense. When you expect that two lines will be enough, you must open three. This is no time for calculated risks. The staff costs that you have saved on Saturday and Sunday, will cause a loss that is 1.000 times bigger. Senior citizens who have read the above article, will now wait till there is a cure or a vaccine.

The EASA Covid-19 Protocol states "social distancing should be respected as much as possible". The European (or Belgian) legislator should amend this Protocol into firmer legislation "must be respected at all times. If not applied, the airport must close".
We close shops.
We install a night curfew.
We allow gatherings of max 4 people.
And then this happens - again:
https://www.lesoir.be/336540/article/20 ... ls-airport

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Re: Impact of the coronavirus crisis on aviation

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Passenger wrote: 08 Nov 2020, 12:37 We close shops.
We install a night curfew.
We allow gatherings of max 4 people.
And then this happens - again:
https://www.lesoir.be/336540/article/20 ... ls-airport
Brussels Airport explains:

I see that you have copied an article from Le Soir about the hustle and bustle at Brussels Airport yesterday. We have already contacted the editors of Le Soir about this, but the situation yesterday cannot be compared at all with last weekend.

Based on a tweet, the newspaper wrote that there were long queues, but the crowds were by no means extreme. At peak time yesterday, there were waiting times of up to 30 minutes, which is a normal peak traffic. Because of the social distance, the lines are longer, and a photo does not always show that distance.

We have noticed that some passengers arrive at the airport quite late, so we tweeted about this again to remind people to get to the airport on time.
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Re: Impact of the coronavirus crisis on aviation

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sn26567 wrote: 08 Nov 2020, 14:33
Passenger wrote: 08 Nov 2020, 12:37 We close shops.
We install a night curfew.
We allow gatherings of max 4 people.
And then this happens - again:
https://www.lesoir.be/336540/article/20 ... ls-airport
Brussels Airport explains:

I see that you have copied an article from Le Soir about the hustle and bustle at Brussels Airport yesterday. We have already contacted the editors of Le Soir about this, but the situation yesterday cannot be compared at all with last weekend.

Based on a tweet, the newspaper wrote that there were long queues, but the crowds were by no means extreme. At peak time yesterday, there were waiting times of up to 30 minutes, which is a normal peak traffic. Because of the social distance, the lines are longer, and a photo does not always show that distance.

We have noticed that some passengers arrive at the airport quite late, so we tweeted about this again to remind people to get to the airport on time.
1. There is no way that the people in this Twitter photo respected the 1,5m minimal distance:
https://pbs.twimg.com/media/EmMmYQ6WMAU ... name=large

2. There can't be a peak time during these corona times.

3. The place with the highest risk of getting infected is the aircraft. With queues like this, it's the airport.

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Re: Impact of the coronavirus crisis on aviation

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Scoop: belgians cant follow rules. Everybody has a stupid shameless excuse and everybody is happy.
Brussels airport is run by belgians.

Now, since the most likely outcome of this is that we all get corona before we get any vaccine, let talk about the future...
How will airports and airlines handle those who already had the corona and dont fear normal travelling nomore, including to the "risky" destinations?
It might be hard for them to produce a negative test as tests might end up positive long after the end of the disease.
Pax volume will only increase as 95%+ population goes through the virus without impact, fear will fade away, life will continue.
So. How?
My messages reflect my personal opinion which may be different than yours. I beleive a forum is made to create a debate so I encourage people to express themselves, the way they want, with the ideas they want. I expect the same understanding in return.

Passenger
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Re: Impact of the coronavirus crisis on aviation

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Acid-drop wrote: 08 Nov 2020, 19:21 Scoop: belgians cant follow rules. Everybody has a stupid shameless excuse and everybody is happy.
Brussels airport is run by belgians.

Now, since the most likely outcome of this is that we all get corona before we get any vaccine, let talk about the future...
How will airports and airlines handle those who already had the corona and dont fear normal travelling nomore, including to the "risky" destinations?
It might be hard for them to produce a negative test as tests might end up positive long after the end of the disease.
Pax volume will only increase as 95%+ population goes through the virus without impact, fear will fade away, life will continue.
So. How?
Fear will not fade away as time goes by. Fear will only end at the moment that people are vaccined.

Till then, most people are too afraid to fly for many reasons. Most important reason: "a passenger sitting close to me might be infected". Airlines and airports might convince these people to fly, but only if a corona test is obliged for all passengers. And not the 72 hours PCR statement, but a speed test at the airport.

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Re: Impact of the coronavirus crisis on aviation

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After 9/11 (well.. not today) the fear of people to fly was mitigated by implementing the security checks. Useful or not, at least they give a sense of safety and security.
After the Coronavirus crisis, we'll probably not only have to put our belt and shoes in a tray, but spit in it as well for a covid test... Sometimes the test result will indicate "suspicious" for some travellers, so they'll swipe you with a swab and that test will be negative so everyone can take the airplane and feel safe and happy.

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Re: Impact of the coronavirus crisis on aviation

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We are not talking about the same people.
Some should protect themselves and fear is helping them to be safe. There is nothing wrong with beeing cautious, those should not fly, the mess at brussels airport only confirms it.

Some others are through corona and want to live normally.
Its already potentially 10% of the population and growing everyday.
My messages reflect my personal opinion which may be different than yours. I beleive a forum is made to create a debate so I encourage people to express themselves, the way they want, with the ideas they want. I expect the same understanding in return.

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Re: Impact of the coronavirus crisis on aviation

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Decimated Norwegian forced to furlough an additional 1,600 employees

Norwegian is forced to furlough employees and reduce capacity considerably following the government’s decision to not support the company financially to get through the corona crisis while simultaneously imposing travel restrictions that actively discourage passengers from travelling. The consequences of the government-imposed travel restrictions are critical and Norwegian needs to keep its running costs to a minimum, while the company continues to work on solutions to survive.

https://www.aviation24.be/airlines/norw ... employees/

Image

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Re: Impact of the coronavirus crisis on aviation

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Daily review:

Air Algerie is expected to reports an annual deficit of $500 million, due to the pandemic. The State is seeking a crisis plan to get the carrier back on its fleet.

Air Canada projects net cash burn of between $842-995 million in 4Q 2020, with plans to reduce 4Q capacity by approximately 75%. Air Canada, which is accelerating the retirement of 79 mainline and Rouge aircraft, is now deferring delivery of 16 B737 MAX 8 and 18 A220s scheduled for delivery in 2021 and 2022 and cancelling 10 MAX 8s and 12 A220s. The carrier expects to take delivery of five A220s in 4Q 2020. CapEx for 2020-23 period is now US$3.0 billion lower.

Alaska Airlines removed an additional eight Airbus aircraft from the fleet permanently. As of 30 September 2020, all operating regional aircraft were in service.

Easyjet has denied that it approached German authorities for emergency funding to help it through the pandemic.

Kenya Airways is considering suspending flights to London and France in the wake of the second lockdown in the two countries. Kenya Airways will also convert two of its B787s into cargo aircraft by 2020 end, after the carrier got the go-ahead from its lessors.

Lufthansa could need more money in 2021, according to a report, though the government dismissed the news as “speculation”. Officials and politicians are also “losing patience” with airline chief Carsten Spohr. Lufthansa executives are not ruling out protective shield proceedings, despite the recent €9 billion in state aid, as the recovery of the group is developing much more slowly than planned.

Luxair, the government, unions, and employers sign a new agreement that covers the establishment of an employment maintenance plan and a redeployment unit, affecting 20% of personnel — around 600 people. The government is financing these measures at an estimated cost of €50 million over three years.

Ryanair chief executive Michael O’Leary has said the UK government should not give airlines a bailout to survive the lockdown – despite rivals’ pleas for further state aid. Ryanair has filed an appeal with the European Court of Justice objecting to the European Commission’s authorization of Spain’s rescue plan for Air Europa.

Singapore Airlines is stepping up efforts to seek fresh sources of funds and it is confident that it will have “very strong liquidity” to tide it through the crisis. SIA was in “advanced” discussions for more sale/leaseback transactions of its aircraft.

TAP Air Portugal restructuring plan being developed by the Boston Consulting Group (US) may involve the dismissal of up to 2,000 workers, which translates into a cut of €150 million in personnel expenses.

Burundi has resumed international flights since 08 November 2020 after it reopened its air borders.

Canada is developing a package of assistance to Canadian airlines, airports and the aerospace sector, contingent on refunding customers. As part of this package, it is ready to establish a process with major airlines regarding financial assistance which could include loans and potentially other support.

Cape Verdean Government approved a state guarantee for an emergency bank loan of US$1 million, for payment of overdue wages at Cabo Verde Airlines.

Chinese airlines are shunning some deliveries of Airbus aircraft, citing fears of coronavirus infection for their staff in the latest tussle over efforts to keep delayed deliveries on track.

Nigeria’s government has approved a US$10.3 million bailout for domestic airlines following the effects of the pandemic. The government also approved an additional $2.5 million in funding to aviation agencies.
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Re: Impact of the coronavirus crisis on aviation

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Passenger wrote: 08 Nov 2020, 18:55
sn26567 wrote: 08 Nov 2020, 14:33
Passenger wrote: 08 Nov 2020, 12:37 We close shops.
We install a night curfew.
We allow gatherings of max 4 people.
And then this happens - again:
https://www.lesoir.be/336540/article/20 ... ls-airport
Brussels Airport explains:

I see that you have copied an article from Le Soir about the hustle and bustle at Brussels Airport yesterday. We have already contacted the editors of Le Soir about this, but the situation yesterday cannot be compared at all with last weekend.

Based on a tweet, the newspaper wrote that there were long queues, but the crowds were by no means extreme. At peak time yesterday, there were waiting times of up to 30 minutes, which is a normal peak traffic. Because of the social distance, the lines are longer, and a photo does not always show that distance.

We have noticed that some passengers arrive at the airport quite late, so we tweeted about this again to remind people to get to the airport on time.
1. There is no way that the people in this Twitter photo respected the 1,5m minimal distance:
https://pbs.twimg.com/media/EmMmYQ6WMAU ... name=large
2. There can't be a peak time during these corona times.
3. The place with the highest risk of getting infected is the aircraft. With queues like this, it's the airport.
French is not my native language, but I think I understand enough of it to understand what Belga journalist Jean Van Driessche just wrote: "...Corona: le @airmediation_fr a adressé un courrier aux autorités fédérales de la Mobilité et à la Direction Générale du Transport Aérien pour témoigner de la "cohue et du non respect des mesures sanitaires" à @BrusselsAirport au cours des trois derniers week-ends..."

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Re: Impact of the coronavirus crisis on aviation

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Passenger wrote: 10 Nov 2020, 14:49 French is not my native language, but I think I understand enough of it to understand what Belga journalist Jean Van Driessche just wrote: "...Corona: le @airmediation_fr a adressé un courrier aux autorités fédérales de la Mobilité et à la Direction Générale du Transport Aérien pour témoigner de la "cohue et du non respect des mesures sanitaires" à @BrusselsAirport au cours des trois derniers week-ends..."
https://www.aviation24.be/airports/brus ... e-airport/
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Re: Impact of the coronavirus crisis on aviation

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(Almost) daily review (for the last two days):

Air Botswana is relaunching its international flights on 10 November 2020, initially with four weekly flights to South Africa.

Air Busan to delay plans to take delivery of two A321neos in 2H 2020 until 2021, due to the impact of coronavirus.

Air Canada is exploring the opportunity to convert several of its owned B767s to freighters subject to concluding satisfactory arrangements with pilots. In other news, Air Canada plans to suspend a further 95 domestic and international routes, and close nine Canadian bases, due to travel restrictions and low demand.

Air Europa will not receive new public bailouts from the Spanish government, leaving Iberia as the only candidate to buy the airline.

Embraer says the regional E-Jets are well-positioned for an eventual recovery due to low demand, with deliveries to increase in the 4Q 2020, especially within its executive jets segment.

Flybondi of Argentina is postponing the restart of its operations set for December 2020 due to the lack of response from the aeronautical authority.

Frontier Airlines CEO Barry Biffle says the carrier is well-placed for further expansion over the coming years fuelled by leisure demand in the US. Frontier has no plans to defer any aircraft orders and hopes capacity is back to pre-pandemic levels going into 4Q 2021.

Grupo Aeromexico plans to continue resuming flights in 2021, although there is still a lot of uncertainty linked to the coronavirus in the sector, which could see a recovery beyond 2022.

Qatar Airways will be forced to make more redundancies as the pandemic continues to affect the demand and where it can fly.

Ryanair expects air passenger numbers to bounce back to almost normal levels by the middle of 2021, based on coronavirus vaccines being “widely available to high-risk groups” by March 2021.

Sunwing has returned to the skies, with the first flight since March 2020 taking off from Toronto and landing in Punta Cana.

Twin Jet of France warns of a bumpy road ahead as the continued effects of the pandemic is impacting its financial situation.
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Re: Impact of the coronavirus crisis on aviation

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Hi. I'm Thibault Lapers. @ThibaultLapers & @TLspotting

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Re: Impact of the coronavirus crisis on aviation

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Daily review:

Air Nostrum has proposed a plan to the unions by which employment is guaranteed in exchange for a 25% reduction in wage costs. The carrier will also cut 14 planes.

Etihad told cabin crew there would be layoffs this week, and the airline will keep its A380s parked “indefinitely” due to a slower than expected recovery in demand.

Lufthansa and the ver.di union have agreed on an initial crisis package on 10 November 2020 after intensive negotiations. The measures, with a volume of more than 200 million euros, will help to overcome the economic effects of the crisis.

Nepal Airlines has been suspended from operating Kathmandu – Hong Kong flights for the third time after another batch of its passengers tested positive for the coronavirus. The ban is for two weeks.

Singapore Airlines Group has deferred its outstanding aircraft on order with Airbus and is in advanced talks with Boeing for the same.

SpiceJet is in talks with lessors, vendors and lenders to either renegotiate contracts or defer payments as it strives to recover from the impact of crisis. The carrier is still in compensation talks with Boeing for its 13 grounded B737 MAX.

Tarom approved a memorandum asking for state aid in the form of a grant of up to€200 million, which would finance half of the five-year restructuring programme.

Virgin Atlantic US$1.6 billion rescue deal two months ago means the airline can survive even if the travel situation worsens, its chief executive said.

Ireland’s government has agreed a revised €80 million funding package for Irish aviation, plus an extra €48 million in supports for 2021 — in addition to those announced in Budget 2021.
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