Brussels Airlines in 2020

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crew1990
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Re: Brussels Airlines in 2020

Post by crew1990 »

cathay belgium wrote: 05 Jun 2020, 18:45 What's the purpose of the crew then really?
Greet the customer, show them the screens for the safety movie, sit down and say yes to people wanting to go to the toilet.. and give the extra smile when leaving the aircraft ???
Make half of the crew redundant then..
I can open the door when I survived the crash myself , I saw the video ;)
So the only purpose of cabin crew for you is to serve your coffee and open a door?

The crew are the master of the safety and security onboard, in case of smoke there are trained to know perfecfetly where the the equipment is and how to use it, you watch a video about it too? And you surely have study the location of all the equipment and you know what type of equimement is on board of your specific aircraft.

Did you watch a video how to use O2 bottle, the risk it can have on an airplane, you also saw how to use some equipment of the flight deck in case of pilot incapacitaion. You probably know perfectly how work a flight deck door, how to open in it in emergency mode and I'm pretty sure the digit code was on your video too.

Did you also watch a video about what to check before departure, that you know how to operate a slide in case of an evacuation if it failed to work etc.

I'm pretty sure you are a master of the symptom of hypoxia and you perfectly know how to deal with it. And if the O2 mask failed to drop, you probably know how to release it manually.

The communication sign, shime and indicator the aircraft is giving you like fire alarm, emergency code etc. And everything displayed on AIP, ACP, FAP etc are not a secret for you.

You have probably studied all the drill flight attendand have to go through to make you flight safe.

I could continue but I think it's pointless with people like you. But I will just say that you are the "I think I know evrething but actually I know nothing" type of people that nobody wish to have on board.

You really think that you need a 2 month training to serve a coffee? Ok this is not a bachelor or master but still you can't imagine the amount of information and skill a flight attend must have. And instead of watching a video of how to open a door. Do something more clever and ask a flight attendant to have a look to his CAM and you see you are totally wrong

So or you are just totally disrespectful or you are totally ignorant.

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cathay belgium
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Re: Brussels Airlines in 2020

Post by cathay belgium »

Hi crew1990,

Missed my remark.. not funny I know ?

Have some stewards as friends and be sure I know what they have to learn and all...
But what I wrote is what most pax probably will think...
When you give no service and you show just your fingers for a whole flight...

But if you ignore the simple fact of no water nor coffee on a two hour flight, guess what you will get on board...
Upsetting pax so the crew can deal with all they had learned 😲
This is anno 2020 what you van expect..
Try a UK holiday flight ;)
( And yes when they fly they can have a coffee in the terminal,in the pubs,.. so when not in flight.. )
What's the difference between two or eight hours when you have masks and gloves.. )

I'm not like that thrust me, I'm one of the better clients just want a window and a coffee haha...with just a backpack haha...

If even Wizz serves drinks and sandwiches... Well if you don't understand my small Point, so be it...

I'm just the always know better but very dumb cliënt/messenger ....

Some airliners will disappear and if you can't attract pax., Make the difference .. no extra smile, just a good service...

SN didn't refund, SN on the edge of bankrupcy, wanting 300 million aid, aircraft and routes gone, 1000 People redundant, bad service center ( rebooked me on a wrong date and you can only rebook once 🙄 , English call center in India ?? ) ( Good FB service have to admit ) , .. THIS is the news about SN nowadays.. and today.. no service...
Well it doesn't make it easier to attract pax..

But like I said.. hope for better times for SN...

CXB
New types flown 2020 : A321neo,B781

Boavida
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Re: Brussels Airlines in 2020

Post by Boavida »

Academics from several Belgian universities plead to completely nationalise Brussels Airlines ànd Brussels Airport. They state that aviation has to become a public sector.

Interesting read!

-- > https://www.vrt.be/vrtnws/nl/2020/06/03 ... ke-dienst/

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lumumba
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Re: Brussels Airlines in 2020

Post by lumumba »

Boavida wrote: 06 Jun 2020, 15:57 Academics from several Belgian universities plead to completely nationalise Brussels Airlines ànd Brussels Airport. They state that aviation has to become a public sector.

Interesting read!

-- > https://www.vrt.be/vrtnws/nl/2020/06/03 ... ke-dienst/
I'm totally agree with it.
Thx
Hasta la victoria siempre.

crew1990
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Joined: 29 Dec 2010, 21:46

Re: Brussels Airlines in 2020

Post by crew1990 »

No you are not totally agree with it, you totally agree with it :-)

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sn26567
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Re: Brussels Airlines in 2020

Post by sn26567 »

Boavida wrote: 06 Jun 2020, 15:57 Academics from several Belgian universities plead to completely nationalise Brussels Airlines ànd Brussels Airport. They state that aviation has to become a public sector.

Interesting read!

-- > https://www.vrt.be/vrtnws/nl/2020/06/03 ... ke-dienst/
Interesting read, perhaps, but do you realise none of the authors has anything to do with aviation? Real specialists!
André
ex Sabena #26567

crew1990
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Re: Brussels Airlines in 2020

Post by crew1990 »

No need to be an aviation specialist to consider what is good for the economy of a country and the international trade asset of this country, better be an economist. For for the profitability of an airline, it's better to have aviation specialist. But in the case of the nationalization of an airport or an airline, the main aim is not to make money, even if it could be profitable, the real aim is to put the country on the international place.

Flanker2
Posts: 1729
Joined: 05 Dec 2012, 23:15

Re: Brussels Airlines in 2020

Post by Flanker2 »

The macro numbers are not good. Company fundamentals are bad across the board and getting worse by the day.
The Belgian government announced a line of measures today to sooth the string of bad news that is approaching.
They are not doing that for our pleasure.


SN is restarting flights.
I don't think that this is a good idea, now is not the time to worry about market share or competition.
From the indications that I have, new bookings are slow and a chunk of passengers are using vouchers/credit to pay for their new reservation.
Airlines in Europe and across the globe could be happy to reach 50% load factors this summer, probably none will be breaking even.

People around me are being fired despite temporary unemployment measures. This is because business owners small and big are panicking.
If you don't open you lose money, if you open you risk losing more money.

I must say that the temporary Belgian government is not doing a bad job.
With regards to SN and Lufthansa, they have taken a no nonsense approach and are not getting ahead of themselves like the Swiss did.
Now is a good time to take a step back and see what is going on.
Lufthansa is going to publish awful Q2 numbers, state aid or no state aid. It's already confirmed that they will drop from the DAX index, meaning that ETF's that are jacking up this market will stop sustaining their stock price.

At some point, LH will have to make a decision.
Even with state aid, they won't be able to keep all units on life support.
LH and LX will get priority, and perhaps there will be a spot for EW.
Unfortunately, I see them abandoning SN, OS, and EN.

LJ
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Re: Brussels Airlines in 2020

Post by LJ »

crew1990 wrote: 06 Jun 2020, 18:51 No need to be an aviation specialist to consider what is good for the economy of a country and the international trade asset of this country, better be an economist. For for the profitability of an airline, it's better to have aviation specialist. But in the case of the nationalization of an airport or an airline, the main aim is not to make money, even if it could be profitable, the real aim is to put the country on the international place.
Specailists take interdependancies into account, academics usually not. Moreover, these academics come to a model which isn't feasible in the current regulatory environment. Simply adressing this pount in the EU is not enough. Airlines operate on a global scale and nationalising the entire EU aviation market would also result in significant less employmet in the same sector. However, it also fails to adress the issue of demand for air travel. It's maybe OK to argue that from an academic point of view it's wise to curtail aviation and think that by increasing prices this will do the trick, in reality there is also something like what customers/voters want. Are the EU citizens going to accept that they cannot go on holiday to Spain anymore? Moreover, how can countries cope with a significant reduction in tourisits when they don't have an alternative (for example Greece/Spain) for that line of business at present. Academics can provide insights, specialists however, should assess feasible alternatives (which can be based on academic insights).

teddybAIR
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Re: Brussels Airlines in 2020

Post by teddybAIR »

Flanker2 wrote: 06 Jun 2020, 21:22 The macro numbers are not good. Company fundamentals are bad across the board and getting worse by the day.
Indeed, but usually when this happens, there is an economic root cause that generated these numbers. In this case it is an unprecedented worldwide months long lock down of a large part of the economy. Next to that, the uncertainty that comes with 1) the abscence of a vaccine and 2) the unpredictability of a possible second wave urges entrepreneurs and households to largely postpone purchases.

On the condition that we can achieve a reliable path to a vaccine and treatment in the medium term, that uncertainty will be largely mitigated and consumer and employer condfidence level will largely restore as the fittest survived the crisis. However, it will be paramount to think about company resilience and shape in a post-corona world where both the virus and the lockdown have affected consumer behavior in various ways.

I think you are right that the cash burning rate will increase when we start flying again due to low yields (I'm rather confident that volumes will largely restore, but more worried about Revenues per Passenger Kilomter). However, that is not a case to delay the start-up for the simple reason that the competitive environment has largely been reset and new first mover advanteges are to be gained. If you do not have the means to outlive the increased cash burn of a start-up phase now, then you will be unlikely to survive a delayed start-up as well.

My expectation is that on a 5 year horizon the companies that will have sustainably survived this crisis, will be the ones who have taken the toughest decisions on the one hand and the ones that are able to maintain the competitive edge they had before the crisis. I worry most about those airlines that seem to be slow or unwilling to adapte or reorganise.

Macro economic numbers will possibly return to pre-corona levels very fast. The world wide stock exchanges are good barometers for the broad sentiment and they do not reflect the times we have gone through sincne january 2020 at all. They reflect overall optimism and seem to take into account a 'W' or possibly even 'V' shaped recovery.

Only time will tell.

oldblueeyes
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Re: Brussels Airlines in 2020

Post by oldblueeyes »

Let's see the realities beside academia, where publishing in Journals and being oft named in followers research is more rated than real life practicability.

The airline industry is consolidating on the long run. Regardless is some like it or not, there will be larger overall players and fewer hubs. All a matter of economics.

The Belgian view is dominated by some heavily emotional facts:
- Sabena - to small to become big and collapsed as a consequence
- KLM as benchmark - a successfull consolidtor coming from a neighbour small country
- intra national rivality - from a rational view there is absolutely no need for the French "mirror" alternatives CRL and Air Belgium - but they are dominating as "options" often the view

The question is - what type of airline does the country need and furthermore - is it able to act consistently towards it?

Let's be fair - SN has a crap image, being built even before Lufthansa put its first cent in as a LCC follower of Virgin Express. It it had no real chance to reposition itself, in market were CRL was offering heavy discounts to Ryanair and Wizzar.
Legacy works well there were LCCs are kept into alternative aiports outside the immediate catchment area - you can see it in AMS, LHR, FRA, MUC, ZRH. And low service legacies are doing badly in nearly no fringe product offerings with LCCs next door - one can see it very well in Scnadinavia with SAS struggeling vss Norwegian, Italy with LCCs having a strong share of the market and Alitalia being in fact a mini airline or even in Spain, were IAG was turning Iberia into Iberia Express in MAD.

Thus coming back to the options:

- a pur national LCC would be to small and baiscally not needed - this can be obtained by letting the market regulate itself - and of course a pure LCC would fly as they can fill the planes and not as frequencies are optimal for the local economy
- a player in the middle was rejected by local patriotism - nothing else would have Eurowings been
- a more hub airline - well this is what is the current idea, but than again - one has to see it in a consolidating market - otherwise, would anyone of you rely on the hubbing experience with Tarom?

sean1982
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Re: Brussels Airlines in 2020

Post by sean1982 »

sn26567 wrote: 06 Jun 2020, 17:14
Boavida wrote: 06 Jun 2020, 15:57 Academics from several Belgian universities plead to completely nationalise Brussels Airlines ànd Brussels Airport. They state that aviation has to become a public sector.

Interesting read!

-- > https://www.vrt.be/vrtnws/nl/2020/06/03 ... ke-dienst/
Interesting read, perhaps, but do you realise none of the authors has anything to do with aviation? Real specialists!
A lot of people on this forum have nothing to do with aviationa nd also talk like real specialists

Flanker2
Posts: 1729
Joined: 05 Dec 2012, 23:15

Re: Brussels Airlines in 2020

Post by Flanker2 »

oldblueeyes wrote: 07 Jun 2020, 09:26 Let's see the realities beside academia, where publishing in Journals and being oft named in followers research is more rated than real life practicability.

The airline industry is consolidating on the long run. Regardless is some like it or not, there will be larger overall players and fewer hubs. All a matter of economics.

The Belgian view is dominated by some heavily emotional facts:
- Sabena - to small to become big and collapsed as a consequence
- KLM as benchmark - a successfull consolidtor coming from a neighbour small country
- intra national rivality - from a rational view there is absolutely no need for the French "mirror" alternatives CRL and Air Belgium - but they are dominating as "options" often the view

The question is - what type of airline does the country need and furthermore - is it able to act consistently towards it?

Let's be fair - SN has a crap image, being built even before Lufthansa put its first cent in as a LCC follower of Virgin Express. It it had no real chance to reposition itself, in market were CRL was offering heavy discounts to Ryanair and Wizzar.
Legacy works well there were LCCs are kept into alternative aiports outside the immediate catchment area - you can see it in AMS, LHR, FRA, MUC, ZRH. And low service legacies are doing badly in nearly no fringe product offerings with LCCs next door - one can see it very well in Scnadinavia with SAS struggeling vss Norwegian, Italy with LCCs having a strong share of the market and Alitalia being in fact a mini airline or even in Spain, were IAG was turning Iberia into Iberia Express in MAD.

Thus coming back to the options:

- a pur national LCC would be to small and baiscally not needed - this can be obtained by letting the market regulate itself - and of course a pure LCC would fly as they can fill the planes and not as frequencies are optimal for the local economy
- a player in the middle was rejected by local patriotism - nothing else would have Eurowings been
- a more hub airline - well this is what is the current idea, but than again - one has to see it in a consolidating market - otherwise, would anyone of you rely on the hubbing experience with Tarom?

Your theory of a consolidating EU market was a pre-Corona reality dominated by large groups swallowing up smaller individual carriers.

In a Corona era, being big is a liability, not an asset. These big airline groups are inflating their balance sheets with debt while burning the cash obtained through that debt, at a record pace. Ultimately, when the parent company fails, all the subsidiaries fail too. This means that being part of a consolidated group is a liability, not an asset.

In a post-Corona reality, we may see a fragmented market with each country keeping its airline alive or building an own airline.

Airline consolidation only works in a pure single market like the US.
In the EU this is meaningless as IAG, AF-KLM and Lufthansa are only groups of airlines that keep all their airlines operating independently in their own countries, so they are not really consolidated companies but groupings of airlines that consolidate their balance sheets and earnings into a parent holding.
Whether this is meaningful in terms of consolidating activity is very questionable as interests are not equally shared within consolidated groups.
Synergies are pursued but whether those synergies are meaningful and exceed internal competition is also difficult to quantify. Only fools could make absolute statements about that.
When you look at the current picture, all the consolidations have lead to nothing as the groups are technically bankrupt or on their way to becoming that.

The airline that has the safest future right now is no less than Alitalia, because its future is not tied to other groups of airlines and the decisions are made by its own government. They are currently the biggest airline in Europe, they are operating essential routes at a loss but as a public service and with respect for social distancing on board.

What countries need right now is this kind of airline.

Flanker2
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Re: Brussels Airlines in 2020

Post by Flanker2 »

teddybAIR wrote: 07 Jun 2020, 09:22
Flanker2 wrote: 06 Jun 2020, 21:22 The macro numbers are not good. Company fundamentals are bad across the board and getting worse by the day.
Indeed, but usually when this happens, there is an economic root cause that generated these numbers. In this case it is an unprecedented worldwide months long lock down of a large part of the economy. Next to that, the uncertainty that comes with 1) the abscence of a vaccine and 2) the unpredictability of a possible second wave urges entrepreneurs and households to largely postpone purchases.

On the condition that we can achieve a reliable path to a vaccine and treatment in the medium term, that uncertainty will be largely mitigated and consumer and employer condfidence level will largely restore as the fittest survived the crisis. However, it will be paramount to think about company resilience and shape in a post-corona world where both the virus and the lockdown have affected consumer behavior in various ways.

I think you are right that the cash burning rate will increase when we start flying again due to low yields (I'm rather confident that volumes will largely restore, but more worried about Revenues per Passenger Kilomter). However, that is not a case to delay the start-up for the simple reason that the competitive environment has largely been reset and new first mover advanteges are to be gained. If you do not have the means to outlive the increased cash burn of a start-up phase now, then you will be unlikely to survive a delayed start-up as well.

My expectation is that on a 5 year horizon the companies that will have sustainably survived this crisis, will be the ones who have taken the toughest decisions on the one hand and the ones that are able to maintain the competitive edge they had before the crisis. I worry most about those airlines that seem to be slow or unwilling to adapte or reorganise.

Macro economic numbers will possibly return to pre-corona levels very fast. The world wide stock exchanges are good barometers for the broad sentiment and they do not reflect the times we have gone through sincne january 2020 at all. They reflect overall optimism and seem to take into account a 'W' or possibly even 'V' shaped recovery.

Only time will tell.

While that is a possibility that we can all hope for, I very much doubt it and most of all in the aviation industry.
Why? Because first of all, the aviation industry is highly seasonal and profits are concentrated on the period of June to September.
June is already a lost cause and bookings for July and August are not picking up pace yet.

A few lines about the stock market:
The current stock market is not a reflection of the fundamentals of the underlying assets.
As many, I've done some research recently trying to make sense of it.
The FED and central banks have swamped the market with lots of cash that institutions and investors are pumping into stocks.
This is causing inflation within the stock market.
At the same time, the trillions in stimulus is creating worry of an inflation, so putting cash in stocks is being considered a defensive strategy, fueling this even more.
However, in the real world, consumers are not spending money because their purchasing power has been cut or reduced.
So the companies behind those stocks are actually experiencing a deflation of their balance sheets.
Cash is being burned while spending is reduced, revenues are down or almost nil.

So what we are experiencing right now on the stock market is a bubble.
The Trillions in stimulus that the central banks have let loose have all been largely parked into the stock market rather than stimulating the economy.
Like all bubbles, it is going to spat sooner or later, we just don't know when and what will be the trigger.
Will it be in July when companies and governments announce Q2 results and GDP numbers?
Will it be in September when companies start failing one after the other?
Will it be in October/November when Coronavirus numbers are going to go up in a strong second wave or at the peak of it in December/January?



Being a first-mover can easily be a disadvantage.
Alitalia's flight this afternoon BRU-FCO seems to have at least 5 out of 34 seats available. According to the seatmap, it's even 11 out of 34 seats.
This is on an A320 and despite open borders in Italy.
The incoming flight is even worse of course with 16 out of 34 seats available.
This is an airline that is operating reliably and offering free first changes, not cancelling flights and issuing vouchers.
(as said earlier, AZ is not doing this for first-mover advantages, but as a public service)

SN already adjusted their schedules many times and I can feel that they are itching to postpone flights.
As I said earlier, I had bookings with Easyjet and Transavia and they were cancelled while route relaunches are being postponed week after week due to low bookings.

There is no money to be made in the current market, only money to be lost.
This is not a theory but a statement on the state of the market.
The situation can improve but I don't see it happening, because people are currently concerned about their incomes and protecting what they have, not about spending money on their travels.
Governments are subsidizing future jobs rather than consumption today. As long as they keep doing that, the stock market will go up, but the real economy will go down, and demand for air travel will remain abysmal.
Last edited by Flanker2 on 07 Jun 2020, 12:33, edited 2 times in total.

nordikcam
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Re: Brussels Airlines in 2020

Post by nordikcam »

Flanker2 wrote: 06 Jun 2020, 21:22 At some point, LH will have to make a decision.

Unfortunately, I see them abandoning SN, OS, and EN.
And therefore de facto nationalization or abandonment of SN by the Belgian Government? What is the rest of the scenario?

Passenger
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Re: Brussels Airlines in 2020

Post by Passenger »

Flanker2 wrote: 07 Jun 2020, 11:30 The airline that has the safest future right now is no less than Alitalia, because its future is not tied to other groups of airlines and the decisions are made by its own government. They are currently the biggest airline in Europe, they are operating essential routes at a loss but as a public service and with respect for social distancing on board.

What countries need right now is this kind of airline.
You have posted a lot of very strange posts here, but I put this one in the top-3.

Flanker2
Posts: 1729
Joined: 05 Dec 2012, 23:15

Re: Brussels Airlines in 2020

Post by Flanker2 »

Passenger wrote: 07 Jun 2020, 12:55
Flanker2 wrote: 07 Jun 2020, 11:30 The airline that has the safest future right now is no less than Alitalia, because its future is not tied to other groups of airlines and the decisions are made by its own government. They are currently the biggest airline in Europe, they are operating essential routes at a loss but as a public service and with respect for social distancing on board.

What countries need right now is this kind of airline.
You have posted a lot of very strange posts here, but I put this one in the top-3.
I think that you find it strange because you don't quite understand what is posted, but I'll gladly clarify.

Ask yourself the question: what does Belgium as a nation need today in the middle of the Covid-19 crisis and in the near future?
Does it need an airline focused on maintaining air links crucial to its industrial, touristic and bureaucratic sectors or does it need an airline focused on restoring services with the least loss or as much profit as possible?

Does Belgium as a nation need a commercial airline flying to Ibiza and Malaga so that Belgians can spend their money there or does it need a nationalized airline to operate links to cities that bring in tourists and/or business?

In other words, wouldn't it be foolish to give state aid to an airline that will take Belgians to Portugal so they can spend their money there? Isn't that like shooting yourself in the foot with a bazooka?

Matt
Posts: 137
Joined: 14 Nov 2018, 09:20

Re: Brussels Airlines in 2020

Post by Matt »

Flanker2 wrote: 07 Jun 2020, 14:55
Passenger wrote: 07 Jun 2020, 12:55
Flanker2 wrote: 07 Jun 2020, 11:30 The airline that has the safest future right now is no less than Alitalia, because its future is not tied to other groups of airlines and the decisions are made by its own government. They are currently the biggest airline in Europe, they are operating essential routes at a loss but as a public service and with respect for social distancing on board.

What countries need right now is this kind of airline.
You have posted a lot of very strange posts here, but I put this one in the top-3.
I think that you find it strange because you don't quite understand what is posted, but I'll gladly clarify.

Ask yourself the question: what does Belgium as a nation need today in the middle of the Covid-19 crisis and in the near future?
Does it need an airline focused on maintaining air links crucial to its industrial, touristic and bureaucratic sectors or does it need an airline focused on restoring services with the least loss or as much profit as possible?

Does Belgium as a nation need a commercial airline flying to Ibiza and Malaga so that Belgians can spend their money there or does it need a nationalized airline to operate links to cities that bring in tourists and/or business?

In other words, wouldn't it be foolish to give state aid to an airline that will take Belgians to Portugal so they can spend their money there? Isn't that like shooting yourself in the foot with a bazooka?
I don't wanna burst your bubble... ( see what I did there? ) But I don't think that will stop Belgians to take other airlines (or their car) to Spain/Portugal/France to spent their money there... Belgium is small, and frankly, I haven't had a vacation in Belgium for a VERY long time. Once I can, I will spend my vacation elsewhere, just because I am sick and tired of this place. Just for 2-3 weeks.

So is it foolish? No. Take a piece of the pie. That's what I say.

Flanker2
Posts: 1729
Joined: 05 Dec 2012, 23:15

Re: Brussels Airlines in 2020

Post by Flanker2 »

Matt wrote: 07 Jun 2020, 15:03
Flanker2 wrote: 07 Jun 2020, 14:55
Passenger wrote: 07 Jun 2020, 12:55
You have posted a lot of very strange posts here, but I put this one in the top-3.
I think that you find it strange because you don't quite understand what is posted, but I'll gladly clarify.

Ask yourself the question: what does Belgium as a nation need today in the middle of the Covid-19 crisis and in the near future?
Does it need an airline focused on maintaining air links crucial to its industrial, touristic and bureaucratic sectors or does it need an airline focused on restoring services with the least loss or as much profit as possible?

Does Belgium as a nation need a commercial airline flying to Ibiza and Malaga so that Belgians can spend their money there or does it need a nationalized airline to operate links to cities that bring in tourists and/or business?

In other words, wouldn't it be foolish to give state aid to an airline that will take Belgians to Portugal so they can spend their money there? Isn't that like shooting yourself in the foot with a bazooka?
I don't wanna burst your bubble... ( see what I did there? ) But I don't think that will stop Belgians to take other airlines (or their car) to Spain/Portugal/France to spent their money there... Belgium is small, and frankly, I haven't had a vacation in Belgium for a VERY long time. Once I can, I will spend my vacation elsewhere, just because I am sick and tired of this place. Just for 2-3 weeks.

So is it foolish? No. Take a piece of the pie. That's what I say.

Well Matt, you like any Belgian are free to go spend your holidays wherever you want, but it's not the Belgian taxpayer's responsibility to facilitate it by giving aid to an airline that will take you there. Especially not in this environment where people are losing their jobs.
If you want to go to Portugal, let the Portuguese government bailout TAP and send them flights to BRU to pick you up.

Can you imagine the rage of Belgian business owners if the government gives state aid to German-owned Brussels Airlines so that Brussels Airlines can lose money flying Belgians to Portugal? That would be pure insanity, Belgian business owners would pay rioters to burn down the Rue de la Loi (figure of speech).

Matt
Posts: 137
Joined: 14 Nov 2018, 09:20

Re: Brussels Airlines in 2020

Post by Matt »

Ansett wrote: 07 Jun 2020, 15:23 It is your right, Matt, to take a vacation abroad. I am fed up with the situation and with what is happening in this country, too. The grass in always greener on the other side of the fence. Well, actually, it is not, this time, with a very few exceptions. I do not want to offend you, but let me ask you this question : is it always absolutely necessary to take a plane to go on a holiday ?
For once, if you don't want to stay in Belgium (just once this summer), you could drive by car to one of the neighboring countries or even to the closest best "pupil of the class", Austria. But, please, do take a flight to Spain, if you feel the need. If you have travel insurance, which I presume you have, just check if it covers you totally in case you get ill abroad and need to be repatriated. I presume most travel insurances will still cover you, but there is no harm in (double) checking. Now I am going to have a coffee and eat a piece of pie. mmmm
Well, I hate driving long distances. But that's me :) ( and personal :D ) no offence taken there. ( edit: I drove once Legoland in Germany, was already too long for me. Hated it )

Grass is not greener on the other side, I have lived in South Africa, Belgium is quite nice. But every now and then I wanna get out of this place. Right now, I am fed up ( but that's another story and off topic )

Enjoy your pie ;)

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