Lufthansa in 2019

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Matt
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Re: Lufthansa in 2019

Post by Matt » 09 Jun 2019, 04:07

Some people might hate me here, but had a flight the other day from MUC to Tokyo Haneda on an A350. What an experience and what a plane! Not much can top an experience like that in economy I'm afraid...

https://imgur.com/d0kuEgW

https://imgur.com/a/CFXQEQy

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Re: Lufthansa in 2019

Post by TLspotting » 14 Jun 2019, 21:11

Lufthansa took delivery of one A320neo, serial 8870.
I'm Thibault Lapers, spotter in Belgium for now 3 years, but not yet across the world and a huuuuuge aviation geek ! Join me on Facebook & Twitter @TLspotting

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Re: Lufthansa in 2019

Post by airtrainer » 17 Jun 2019, 06:20

Matt wrote:
09 Jun 2019, 04:07
Some people might hate me here, but had a flight the other day from MUC to Tokyo Haneda on an A350. What an experience and what a plane! Not much can top an experience like that in economy I'm afraid...

https://imgur.com/d0kuEgW

https://imgur.com/a/CFXQEQy
At 31/17 pitch/width it's even worse than Iberia's slaveship. No thanks.

Matt
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Re: Lufthansa in 2019

Post by Matt » 17 Jun 2019, 08:35

airtrainer wrote:
17 Jun 2019, 06:20
Matt wrote:
09 Jun 2019, 04:07
Some people might hate me here, but had a flight the other day from MUC to Tokyo Haneda on an A350. What an experience and what a plane! Not much can top an experience like that in economy I'm afraid...

https://imgur.com/d0kuEgW

https://imgur.com/a/CFXQEQy
At 31/17 pitch/width it's even worse than Iberia's slaveship. No thanks.
Well if you are over 220 pounds I wouldn't recommend it either. But in general: you'll have a bad time flying economy.

Depends on how much space you need of course. With my body, I don't see any difference between 17 and 18 inches. I prefer a decent lumbar support and cushioning over 2 inches of width for long haul.

Personal preference, of course.

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Re: Lufthansa in 2019

Post by sn26567 » 18 Jun 2019, 11:14

An article very critical of the leadership of Carsten Spohr "From hero to zero"!

https://www.bloomberg.com/opinion/artic ... ro-to-zero

Some terrible sentences:

"But Spohr can’t just blame external factors. His company has chased growth to the detriment of profitability and it has spent heavily on new jets and integrating older ones from the insolvent Air Berlin"

"Spohr’s big idea — a budget subsidiary called Eurowings — has been a disaster."

"Once seen as a safe steward of Lufthansa’s capital, he’s starting to look a little reckless."

Pity to see Brussels Airlines becoming part of the disaster!
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Re: Lufthansa in 2019

Post by Ansett » 18 Jun 2019, 23:34

For me this has been written in the stars just like Korongo's demise (this statement will seem pretentious to some, sorry).

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Re: Lufthansa in 2019

Post by sn26567 » 20 Jun 2019, 21:14

Lufthansa plans to offer Munich – Newcastle service with A319, commencing on 03 February 2020.
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Ott
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Re: Lufthansa in 2019

Post by Ott » 21 Jun 2019, 08:33

According to Estonian media and Tallinn airport Facebook Lufthansa is going to fly Munich - Tallinn 3 weekly starting from 04 november 2019.

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Re: Lufthansa in 2019

Post by sn26567 » 25 Jun 2019, 21:05

Lufthansa will look at ordering the A321XLR, says chief executive Carsten Spohr, but added that he did not think the new model was a game changer.

Can Spohr be wrong on this one too? Oh, he will never openly admit a mistake, despite the recent slap he got in his face...
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Conti764
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Re: Lufthansa in 2019

Post by Conti764 » 25 Jun 2019, 22:25

sn26567 wrote:
25 Jun 2019, 21:05
Lufthansa will look at ordering the A321XLR, says chief executive Carsten Spohr, but added that he did not think the new model was a game changer.

Can Spohr be wrong on this one too? Oh, he will never openly admit a mistake, despite the recent slap he got in his face...
It remains to be seen... SN could do a handful of destinations on an XLR for which the A330 is overkill, but LX or OS, let alone LH itself?

What routes might be possible from MUC? FRA is out of the question since it's LH's power hub and it's constraint so LH needs capacity at FRA.

Since airlines all over the world are looking to dispose A380's the business model of aviation might drastically change in the not so distant future. The era of mega hubs seem to come to an end and attention might shift again to more direct flying on 787 and A350, no wonder those two are increasingly dispatched to a smaller airport like BRU.

In that perspective the A321XLR might play its role as well, like the B752 did when a lot of transatlantic routes which were unrealistic before became possible.

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Re: Lufthansa in 2019

Post by Matt » 26 Jun 2019, 08:24

Conti764 wrote:
25 Jun 2019, 22:25
sn26567 wrote:
25 Jun 2019, 21:05
Lufthansa will look at ordering the A321XLR, says chief executive Carsten Spohr, but added that he did not think the new model was a game changer.

Can Spohr be wrong on this one too? Oh, he will never openly admit a mistake, despite the recent slap he got in his face...
It remains to be seen... SN could do a handful of destinations on an XLR for which the A330 is overkill, but LX or OS, let alone LH itself?

What routes might be possible from MUC? FRA is out of the question since it's LH's power hub and it's constraint so LH needs capacity at FRA.

Since airlines all over the world are looking to dispose A380's the business model of aviation might drastically change in the not so distant future. The era of mega hubs seem to come to an end and attention might shift again to more direct flying on 787 and A350, no wonder those two are increasingly dispatched to a smaller airport like BRU.

In that perspective the A321XLR might play its role as well, like the B752 did when a lot of transatlantic routes which were unrealistic before became possible.
I don't really see how the A321XLR will become a game changer either. but we will see how things turn out. I loath the idea of a transatlantic flight on an a321 ( just like I loathed the idea of a 757-200 )

I can see SN using one for an evening flight to NY tough.

FYI: the 757-200 didnt drastically change the industry either and the range is not that different.

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Re: Lufthansa in 2019

Post by sn26567 » 26 Jun 2019, 09:17

Matt wrote:
26 Jun 2019, 08:24
I don't really see how the A321XLR will become a game changer either. but we will see how things turn out. I loath the idea of a transatlantic flight on an a321 ( just like I loathed the idea of a 757-200 )

I can see SN using one for an evening flight to NY tough.

FYI: the 757-200 didnt drastically change the industry either and the range is not that different.
When transatlantic jets were introduced in the 1960ies, they were operated on single-aisle aircraft: Boeing 707, DC8, Convair 880. But the comfort was excellent: I fondly remembered many flights to JFK and ATL on Sabena's 707s, in Economy, mind you. It all depends on how the cabin is outfitted.
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Matt
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Re: Lufthansa in 2019

Post by Matt » 26 Jun 2019, 10:26

sn26567 wrote:
26 Jun 2019, 09:17
Matt wrote:
26 Jun 2019, 08:24
I don't really see how the A321XLR will become a game changer either. but we will see how things turn out. I loath the idea of a transatlantic flight on an a321 ( just like I loathed the idea of a 757-200 )

I can see SN using one for an evening flight to NY tough.

FYI: the 757-200 didnt drastically change the industry either and the range is not that different.
When transatlantic jets were introduced in the 1960ies, they were operated on single-aisle aircraft: Boeing 707, DC8, Convair 880. But the comfort was excellent: I fondly remembered many flights to JFK and ATL on Sabena's 707s, in Economy, mind you. It all depends on how the cabin is outfitted.
Indeed, how the cabin is outfitted, that for me is the problem, if I see pictures of the 60's, those cabins look a lot more spacious than the cabins nowadays. Of course I am too young to have actually seen this. but is this the case? were they more spacious? ( or at least: had the impression of being more spacious? )

i know: it's off topic. But i'm curious :D

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Conti764
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Re: Lufthansa in 2019

Post by Conti764 » 26 Jun 2019, 10:54

Matt wrote:
26 Jun 2019, 10:26
sn26567 wrote:
26 Jun 2019, 09:17
Matt wrote:
26 Jun 2019, 08:24
I don't really see how the A321XLR will become a game changer either. but we will see how things turn out. I loath the idea of a transatlantic flight on an a321 ( just like I loathed the idea of a 757-200 )

I can see SN using one for an evening flight to NY tough.

FYI: the 757-200 didnt drastically change the industry either and the range is not that different.
When transatlantic jets were introduced in the 1960ies, they were operated on single-aisle aircraft: Boeing 707, DC8, Convair 880. But the comfort was excellent: I fondly remembered many flights to JFK and ATL on Sabena's 707s, in Economy, mind you. It all depends on how the cabin is outfitted.
Indeed, how the cabin is outfitted, that for me is the problem, if I see pictures of the 60's, those cabins look a lot more spacious than the cabins nowadays. Of course I am too young to have actually seen this. but is this the case? were they more spacious? ( or at least: had the impression of being more spacious? )

i know: it's off topic. But i'm curious :D
Back in those days, flying was limited to the happy few. ;)

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Re: Lufthansa in 2019

Post by PttU » 26 Jun 2019, 11:08

Matt wrote:
26 Jun 2019, 10:26
sn26567 wrote:
26 Jun 2019, 09:17
Matt wrote:
26 Jun 2019, 08:24
I don't really see how the A321XLR will become a game changer either. but we will see how things turn out. I loath the idea of a transatlantic flight on an a321 ( just like I loathed the idea of a 757-200 )

I can see SN using one for an evening flight to NY tough.

FYI: the 757-200 didnt drastically change the industry either and the range is not that different.
When transatlantic jets were introduced in the 1960ies, they were operated on single-aisle aircraft: Boeing 707, DC8, Convair 880. But the comfort was excellent: I fondly remembered many flights to JFK and ATL on Sabena's 707s, in Economy, mind you. It all depends on how the cabin is outfitted.
Indeed, how the cabin is outfitted, that for me is the problem, if I see pictures of the 60's, those cabins look a lot more spacious than the cabins nowadays. Of course I am too young to have actually seen this. but is this the case? were they more spacious? ( or at least: had the impression of being more spacious? )

i know: it's off topic. But i'm curious :D
Didn't they have a 2-3-layout? That surely creates a more spacious layout compared to 3-3. Wikipedia says the 707 (and 757) have a fuselage width of 3759 mm, the A320-family with the A321XLR a fuselage width of 3.95m. A difference of only 20cm, but it's a little bit more spacious anyway...

But yeh, it all depends.... https://www.gettyimages.be/detail/nieuw ... s/51425930

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Re: Lufthansa in 2019

Post by sn26567 » 28 Jun 2019, 23:12

PttU wrote:
26 Jun 2019, 11:08
Didn't they have a 2-3-layout? That surely creates a more spacious layout compared to 3-3. Wikipedia says the 707 (and 757) have a fuselage width of 3759 mm, the A320-family with the A321XLR a fuselage width of 3.95m. A difference of only 20cm, but it's a little bit more spacious anyway...
The seats of the 707 were in 3-3 layout, probably somewhat narrower than the A320 seats, but with a pitch of 34" (vs 31" as long-haul economy standard now).

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Re: Lufthansa in 2019

Post by sn26567 » 28 Jun 2019, 23:14

Lufthansa Cargo is in talks with unions to retire its MD-11F fleet earlier than planned, with the 12 freighters on track to exit in 2020.
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Re: Lufthansa in 2019

Post by sn26567 » 08 Jul 2019, 19:17

German investors and financiers don't believe Carsten Spohr can put back Lufthansa on the right track. Hereunder an article from Focus Magazin issued today (translated from German):

Mr. Spohr, please fasten your seat belt!

Lufthansa CEO Carsten Spohr has come into severe turbulence with Europe's largest airline. Kerosene is becoming more expensive, tickets are getting cheaper, climate discussion. And now strikes are also threatening. Can the top manager reinvent the airline?

A stall is considered a particularly dangerous phenomenon in aviation. If the airflow is missing under the wings, aircraft crash. Only courageous manoeuvers can prevent worse. Carsten Spohr, 52, head of Lufthansa with his own A320 pilot license, is currently experiencing a personal stall. It looks like fortune left him after five years as CEO.

This was demonstrated, for example, when Lufthansa invited in particular investors and shareholders to its Capital Markets Day at the Frankfurt headquarters in order to convince them of the course of the airline group. Unfortunately, this failed brilliantly, because after five hours of presentations, charts and assurances by Spohr and four of his colleagues on the management board ("We are committed to a higher profit"), the ruling of the stockbrokers was unequivocal: a new low for Lufthansa shares. Recently, the share price was lower only before the bankruptcy of Air Berlin - in March 2017. Among the CEOs of the 30 largest German companies (Dax), Spohr is actually an extraordinary speaker (even in English), but he could not convince his audience.
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Poiu
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Re: Lufthansa in 2019

Post by Poiu » 08 Jul 2019, 20:57

sn26567 wrote:
08 Jul 2019, 19:17
A stall is considered a particularly dangerous phenomenon in aviation. If the airflow is missing under the wings, aircraft crash. Only courageous manoeuvers can prevent worse.
Off topic, but as this is an aviation forum....
An aircraft will stall (not necessarily crash) when the airflow OVER the wing (not under the wing) is missing.

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Re: Lufthansa in 2019

Post by crew1990 » 08 Jul 2019, 21:52

Poiu wrote:
08 Jul 2019, 20:57
sn26567 wrote:
08 Jul 2019, 19:17
A stall is considered a particularly dangerous phenomenon in aviation. If the airflow is missing under the wings, aircraft crash. Only courageous manoeuvers can prevent worse.
Off topic, but as this is an aviation forum....
An aircraft will stall (not necessarily crash) when the airflow OVER the wing (not under the wing) is missing.
Well, actually both air flow are important, and the phenomen of "Lift" is explain by the Bernnouilli law. Basicaly, because of the airspeed difference between the extrados (top of the wing) and intrados (Under the wing), it's resulting in a difference of pressure on both part of the wing wich create the lift.

In aviation we tend to give a lot of importance on the top of the wing because this is where the ice and snow can deviate the air flow. But actualy both airflow are important.

If the air flow is deviated, the lift, the force pushing the the aircraft upward become weaker than the weight, the force applying downward due to the gravity, the attraction of the aircraft with the earth.

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