Brexit and British Airways, easyJet, Ryanair, et al.

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Ozzie1969
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Re: British Airways and the Brexit?

Post by Ozzie1969 » 29 Jun 2016, 10:30

sean1982 wrote:Sun air.
Thank you. Do they still fly their Dornier? I'm only asking because we may be visiting Legoland next year.

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Re: British Airways and the Brexit?

Post by sean1982 » 29 Jun 2016, 10:54

Ozzie1969 wrote:
sean1982 wrote:Sun air.
Thank you. Do they still fly their Dornier? I'm only asking because we may be visiting Legoland next year.
They do, but I think Inquirer is correct in saying that they do no longer operate the route from BRU.

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Re: British Airways and the Brexit?

Post by sn26567 » 30 Jun 2016, 00:08

Qatar Airways is reportedly considering further increasing its stake in IAG, the parent of British Airways, after the UK-based company lost a third of its market value in the fallout from the country’s vote to leave the EU.
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Re: British Airways and the Brexit?

Post by sean1982 » 30 Jun 2016, 10:28

It's NOT uk based. It's based in Spain.

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Re: British Airways and the Brexit?

Post by Passenger » 30 Jun 2016, 10:47

Both of you are right: IAG is UK based, and IAG is registered in Spain:

About us on http://www.iairgroup.com:

"...Formed in January 2011, IAG is the parent company of Aer Lingus, British Airways, Iberia and Vueling. It is a Spanish registered company with shares traded on the London Stock Exchange and Spanish Stock Exchanges. The corporate head office for IAG is in London, UK..."

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Re: British Airways and the Brexit?

Post by sn26567 » 30 Jun 2016, 11:19

Sean, you'll soon be working for Qatar Airways ;)

No doubt that the Brexit will accelerate the increase in power of Qatar Airways in IAG.
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Re: British Airways and the Brexit?

Post by sean1982 » 30 Jun 2016, 12:02

sn26567 wrote:Sean, you'll soon be working for Qatar Airways ;)

No doubt that the Brexit will accelerate the increase in power of Qatar Airways in IAG.
Isnt it funny how the vote "to get their country back" is pushing their flagship in middle eastern hands.

On the up side. They have deep pockets

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Re: British Airways and the Brexit?

Post by Ansett » 04 Jul 2016, 23:25

I don't understand the uproar or even panic around the Brexit. I don't trust the Brits and would not be surprised that just before Christmas, the (new) Prime Minister announces that the UK will not leave the EU for reasons of national interest and in order to maintain the cohesion of the country. Why before Christmas ? Because people will have other things on their minds. As to the EU, it cannot force the UK to leave.
If there is a Brexit, I see it like this (for what it's worth) : a house is on fire. Unfortunately, there is one casualty. The firemen are extinguishing the fire. There is quite some damage, but a new house will be built, different but not necessarily worse than the one that went up in fire.
If there is a Brexit, the pound sterling and the British economy will take a dip for a few years, then they will recover. Stock exchanges are so volatile that some are already recovering. The EU will be better off without a partner that wants to be in the EU as if it weren't. As to British carriers, most will survive thanks to their focus on North America and Asia and new bilateral air traffic agreements will come into force very quickly.
Signed : Ansett's cristal ball.

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Re: British Airways and the Brexit?

Post by Passenger » 05 Jul 2016, 13:38

Ansett wrote:As to the EU, it cannot force the UK to leave.
Moderators have asked not to make this is a political discussion about the Brexit, so I reply as brief as possible. Yes, the EU can force the UK out. See Article 7: http://eur-lex.europa.eu/legal-content/ ... :12012M007

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Re: British Airways and the Brexit?

Post by sean1982 » 05 Jul 2016, 15:05

Passenger wrote:
Ansett wrote:As to the EU, it cannot force the UK to leave.
Moderators have asked not to make this is a political discussion about the Brexit, so I reply as brief as possible. Yes, the EU can force the UK out. See Article 7: http://eur-lex.europa.eu/legal-content/ ... :12012M007
Nikos Skoutaris, lecturer in European Union law at the University of East Anglia said: “To trigger article 7, there must be a reason to do with the foundational values of the EU, democracy and the rule of the law on so on. It has never been used. There have been occasions when there have been threats to use it, in the 1990’s when there was a possibility of neo-Nazis being in an Austrian coalition.

the EU can only suspend a member if it deems it to be in breach of basic principles of freedom, democracy, equality and rule of law, which is not the case here

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Re: British Airways and the Brexit?

Post by Passenger » 29 Oct 2016, 12:55

The Guardian (28/10/2016): "...British Airways owner International Airlines Group has cut its profit forecast for the second time since the EU referendum, blaming the weaker pound and poor trading. IAG, which also owns Vueling, Iberia and Aer Lingus, had a bumpy ride in the third quarter as profit took a €162m (£145m) hit from the pound’s tumble and air traffic control strikes, which led to repeated flight cancellations. This comes on top of a €148m currency hit in the second quarter. Bookings also suffered because of the Brexit vote, especially for business travel..."

Continues here:
https://www.theguardian.com/business/20 ... rd-quarter

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Re: British Airways and the Brexit?

Post by sn26567 » 11 Nov 2016, 16:30

International Airlines Group (IAG) CEO Willie Walsh, speaking in Washington DC Nov. 9 at the International Aviation Club, congratulated President-elect Donald Trump on his election victory, and urged the US government and the aviation industry to support a new US-UK Open Skies agreement modeled on the existing US-European Union (EU) Open Skies agreement.

Hey, if you leave the EU, you leave its advantages as well...

http://atwonline.com/open-skies/iag-ceo ... -agreement
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Re: British Airways and the Brexit?

Post by RoMax » 11 Nov 2016, 16:39

sn26567 wrote:International Airlines Group (IAG) CEO Willie Walsh, speaking in Washington DC Nov. 9 at the International Aviation Club, congratulated President-elect Donald Trump on his election victory, and urged the US government and the aviation industry to support a new US-UK Open Skies agreement modeled on the existing US-European Union (EU) Open Skies agreement.

Hey, if you leave the EU, you leave its advantages as well...

http://atwonline.com/open-skies/iag-ceo ... -agreement
True, but open skies agreements are not unique to the EU. In the case of the EU-US it concerns a multilateral open skies agreement, but there are many more examples worldwide of bilateral open skies agreements between two single countries. The UK and US are free to negotiate a new bilateral open skies agreement.

For BA's OpenSkies division, of course they will need an AOC from an EU country to continue operating to the US.

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Re: British Airways and the Brexit?

Post by LJ » 12 Nov 2016, 09:44

RoMax wrote:True, but open skies agreements are not unique to the EU. In the case of the EU-US it concerns a multilateral open skies agreement, but there are many more examples worldwide of bilateral open skies agreements between two single countries. The UK and US are free to negotiate a new bilateral open skies agreement.
Which is why he's a little bit worried as Trump doesn't believe (at least at the moment) in these kind of agreements if it doesn't benefit US companies (which one can argue as access to Heathrow is limited). This means IAG will have to do some lobbying.

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Re: British Airways and the Brexit?

Post by sean1982 » 12 Nov 2016, 14:28

RoMax wrote:
sn26567 wrote:International Airlines Group (IAG) CEO Willie Walsh, speaking in Washington DC Nov. 9 at the International Aviation Club, congratulated President-elect Donald Trump on his election victory, and urged the US government and the aviation industry to support a new US-UK Open Skies agreement modeled on the existing US-European Union (EU) Open Skies agreement.

Hey, if you leave the EU, you leave its advantages as well...

http://atwonline.com/open-skies/iag-ceo ... -agreement
True, but open skies agreements are not unique to the EU. In the case of the EU-US it concerns a multilateral open skies agreement, but there are many more examples worldwide of bilateral open skies agreements between two single countries. The UK and US are free to negotiate a new bilateral open skies agreement.

For BA's OpenSkies division, of course they will need an AOC from an EU country to continue operating to the US.
In case of a "hard Brexit" yes, which seems very unlikely.

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Re: British Airways and the Brexit?

Post by convair » 12 Nov 2016, 16:02

sean1982 wrote: In case of a "hard Brexit" yes, which seems very unlikely.
As most British people will discover, there is no such thing as a "hard Brexist" or a "soft Brexit"; there is Brexit full stop. If and when you resign from a club, you're no longer bound by the rules of the club, but the club has no more obligation towards you.

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Re: British Airways and the Brexit?

Post by sean1982 » 12 Nov 2016, 16:22

convair wrote:
sean1982 wrote: In case of a "hard Brexit" yes, which seems very unlikely.
As most British people will discover, there is no such thing as a "hard Brexist" or a "soft Brexit"; there is Brexit full stop. If and when you resign from a club, you're no longer bound by the rules of the club, but the club has no more obligation towards you.
Bold language :mrgreen:

Switzerland? Norway? ...

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Re: British Airways and the Brexit?

Post by lumumba » 12 Nov 2016, 16:37

sean1982 wrote:
convair wrote:
sean1982 wrote: In case of a "hard Brexit" yes, which seems very unlikely.
As most British people will discover, there is no such thing as a "hard Brexist" or a "soft Brexit"; there is Brexit full stop. If and when you resign from a club, you're no longer bound by the rules of the club, but the club has no more obligation towards you.
Bold language :mrgreen:

Switzerland? Norway? ...
I'm agree with Sean hear but anyway it will not be cheaper for the UK after the Brexit,take Norway for example it cost there a lot of money to be able to make business with the EU but without to be part of it.

So if they do the same deal has Norway it will cost them more money than what they should normally spend if they where part of the EU.

And a hard Brexit without any deal that would be terrible for them but this look very unlikely...
Hasta la victoria siempre.

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Re: British Airways and the Brexit?

Post by convair » 12 Nov 2016, 20:41

sean1982 wrote:
convair wrote:
sean1982 wrote: In case of a "hard Brexit" yes, which seems very unlikely.
As most British people will discover, there is no such thing as a "hard Brexist" or a "soft Brexit"; there is Brexit full stop. If and when you resign from a club, you're no longer bound by the rules of the club, but the club has no more obligation towards you.
Bold language :mrgreen:

Switzerland? Norway? ...
What I am saying is that all international agreements signed by the EU (in the name of the member countries) will obviously no longer cover/include Britain.
Britain might be able to conclude its own agreements at equivalent, better, or worse terms as those they had under the EU umbrella but they will require new negotiations in which the EU will not be involved, hence no matter how hard or how soft they will see their Brexit.

And, BTW, the people did not vote for a hard or a soft Brexit, they voted for Brexit. All these discussions going on now about hard or soft Brexit merely confirm that people did not know what they were voting for.
And those who voted to Remain didn't know either, except that they were linking their future to that of the other members.

Agreements between Britain and the EU (à la Switzerland or Norway) are another matter. A looser form of association with the EU could be reached, but it means concessions will have to be made, ON BOTH SIDES.

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Re: British Airways and the Brexit?

Post by sean1982 » 12 Nov 2016, 21:03

convair wrote:
sean1982 wrote:
convair wrote:
As most British people will discover, there is no such thing as a "hard Brexist" or a "soft Brexit"; there is Brexit full stop. If and when you resign from a club, you're no longer bound by the rules of the club, but the club has no more obligation towards you.
Bold language :mrgreen:

Switzerland? Norway? ...
What I am saying is that all international agreements signed by the EU (in the name of the member countries) will obviously no longer cover/include Britain.
Britain might be able to conclude its own agreements at equivalent, better, or worse terms as those they had under the EU umbrella but they will require new negotiations in which the EU will not be involved, hence no matter how hard or how soft they will see their Brexit.

And, BTW, the people did not vote for a hard or a soft Brexit, they voted for Brexit. All these discussions going on now about hard or soft Brexit merely confirm that people did not know what they were voting for.
And those who voted to Remain didn't know either, except that they were linking their future to that of the other members.

Agreements between Britain and the EU (à la Switzerland or Norway) are another matter. A looser form of association with the EU could be reached, but it means concessions will have to be made, ON BOTH SIDES.
Dont know why you are getting so worked up about this. The people voted for Brexit by a small majority. Politicians now have to make it happen keeping the best interests of the WHOLE country in mind. (If not you get Trump-like protests) I think everyone with a bit of common sense can understand that strong Ties with the EU are in the best interests of both parties. Off course concessions willen made.

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