Brexit and British Airways, easyJet, Ryanair, et al.

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Re: Brexit and British Airways, easyJet, Ryanair, et al.

Post by sn26567 » 28 May 2018, 22:28

Britain is set to seal an “open skies” agreement with the US in summer 2018 that will keep planes flying between both countries after Brexit.
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Re: Brexit and British Airways, easyJet, Ryanair, et al.

Post by sn26567 » 09 Jul 2018, 17:39

A soft Brexit: the UK remains in the common free trade area and there is no problem anymore for the airlines to fly between the UK and the other EU countries. Remains to be seen what will happen to the links between the UK and non-EU countries...
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Re: Brexit and British Airways, easyJet, Ryanair, et al.

Post by convair » 09 Jul 2018, 18:28

sn26567 wrote:
09 Jul 2018, 17:39
A soft Brexit: the UK remains in the common free trade area and there is no problem anymore for the airlines to fly between the UK and the other EU countries. Remains to be seen what will happen to the links between the UK and non-EU countries...
...and to Mrs May's government.

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Re: Brexit and British Airways, easyJet, Ryanair, et al.

Post by Passenger » 09 Jul 2018, 20:00

When Boris would take over party leadership from May, we're far away from a soft and negociated deal.

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Re: Brexit and British Airways, easyJet, Ryanair, et al.

Post by sn26567 » 16 Jul 2018, 18:12

UK Prime Minister Theresa May says her controversial Brexit blueprint, which caused the resignation of Boris Johnson and David Davies, will safeguard millions of jobs in the aerospace industry. I believe her on that!
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Re: Brexit and British Airways, easyJet, Ryanair, et al.

Post by Passenger » 19 Jul 2018, 16:25

There has been a cascade of press reports about the brexit. Today there is also an official communication from the European Commission about the brexit: the EC calls it a "Communication on preparing for the UK's withdrawal from the EU".

I haven't checked what the European Commission tells about aviation & the brexit, but it's probably in one of the documents that is added to the press release. See "For more information..." at the end of this page:
http://europa.eu/rapid/press-release_IP-18-4545_en.htm

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Re: Brexit and British Airways, easyJet, Ryanair, et al.

Post by Passenger » 20 Jul 2018, 15:57

Passenger wrote:
19 Jul 2018, 16:25
There has been a cascade of press reports about the brexit. Today there is also an official communication from the European Commission about the brexit: the EC calls it a "Communication on preparing for the UK's withdrawal from the EU".

I haven't checked what the European Commission tells about aviation & the brexit, but it's probably in one of the documents that is added to the press release. See "For more information..." at the end of this page:
http://europa.eu/rapid/press-release_IP-18-4545_en.htm
Quote from one of the documents:
SECTORIAL ILLUSTRATIONS OF PREPAREDNESS - CHALLENGES AND ACTIONS - TRANSPORT, INCLUDING AVIATION

Depending on the mode of transport (air, road, rail, maritime, inland waterway), the EU sets rules for the safety, security, and access to the EU market. These rules usually create distinctions between EU operators and third country operators and provide access to those who comply with EU requirements.

EU transport businesses should carefully assess whether the change of status of the United Kingdom from a Member State to a third country impacts their operations, and should take the necessary preparedness measures.

The Commission has published 10 notices relevant for the area of transport (air transport, aviation safety, aviation and maritime security, road transport, rail transport, seafarer qualifications, maritime transport, consumer protection and passenger rights, inland waterways, industrial products), which set out in clear terms the implications of the United Kingdom's withdrawal from the EU's legal and regulatory framework, e.g. in the area of aviation safety, in the absence of any particular arrangement, thus providing stakeholders with the requisite clarity on the baseline situation to which they were advised to adapt.

The Commission will adopt in the foreseeable future two proposals to amend existing Regulations where the changes would be necessary under any scenario. Amending the Regulation concerning the recognition at the Union level of organisations entrusted with duties in relation to the inspection and survey of ships will increase legal certainty, secure business continuity for the affected ship owners and preserve competitiveness of EU-27 Member States' flags. The proposal to amend the Regulation establishing the Connecting Europe Facility aims at rectifying the situation following the United Kingdom's withdrawal, when the transport infrastructure of the latter will no longer be situated in the Union to ensure continued connectivity of the EU network.
It's not easy to find the one relevant notice about aviation...


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Re: Brexit and British Airways, easyJet, Ryanair, et al.

Post by sn26567 » 23 Jul 2018, 16:09

Ryanair hopes to receive its UK AOC before the end of 2018, ahead of Brexit transition.
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Re: Brexit and British Airways, easyJet, Ryanair, et al.

Post by sn26567 » 03 Sep 2018, 23:22

EasyJet is shifting its pilots based in mainland Europe to Austrian and German licenses in an effort to minimize the potential fall-out from a no-deal Brexit.
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Re: Brexit and British Airways, easyJet, Ryanair, et al.

Post by sn26567 » 11 Sep 2018, 18:33

sn26567 wrote:
03 Sep 2018, 23:22
EasyJet is shifting its pilots based in mainland Europe to Austrian and German licenses in an effort to minimize the potential fall-out from a no-deal Brexit.
EasyJet to shift 1,400 UK pilot licences to Austrian ones as the LCC prepares for a no-deal Brexit.
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Re: Brexit and British Airways, easyJet, Ryanair, et al.

Post by Passenger » 03 Oct 2018, 23:00

Study, requested by the Transport & Travel Committee from the European Parliament:
"Brexit: transport and tourism - the consequences of a no-deal scenario"
pdf 2,85 MB:
http://www.europarl.europa.eu/RegData/e ... 499_EN.pdf

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Re: Brexit and British Airways, easyJet, Ryanair, et al.

Post by sn26567 » 28 Nov 2018, 23:38

US offers UK inferior open skies deal after Brexit

https://www.ft.com/content/9461157c-1f9 ... d3483b8b80

Interesting reading: the proposed deal contains ownership clauses, but none of the three major transatlantic airlines of Britain (British Airways, Virgin Atlantic, Norwegian UK) has the required 50% British ownership. Big problem ahead!

A 50% EU ownership is currently not a problem.
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Re: Brexit and British Airways, easyJet, Ryanair, et al.

Post by sn26567 » 06 Dec 2018, 22:58

sn26567 wrote:
28 Nov 2018, 23:38
US offers UK inferior open skies deal after Brexit

https://www.ft.com/content/9461157c-1f9 ... d3483b8b80

Interesting reading: the proposed deal contains ownership clauses, but none of the three major transatlantic airlines of Britain (British Airways, Virgin Atlantic, Norwegian UK) has the required 50% British ownership. Big problem ahead!

A 50% EU ownership is currently not a problem.
UK based airlines will be able to remain owned by UK, EU and European Economic Area shareholders rather than by UK nationals alone after Brexit, under the terms of the new air services agreement struck with the US.
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Re: Brexit and British Airways, easyJet, Ryanair, et al.

Post by sn26567 » 14 Dec 2018, 20:26

Britons will have to pay €7 every three years to travel to EU countries, as a consequence of Brexit.

The European Commission has confirmed that while UK travellers will not need a visa, they will need to apply for and buy another document.

It is called an ETIAS (European Travel Information and Authorisation System) and although not launched yet, is expected to come into force in 2021.

https://www.bbc.com/news/uk-46564884
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Re: Brexit and British Airways, easyJet, Ryanair, et al.

Post by Passenger » 14 Dec 2018, 22:49

sn26567 wrote:
14 Dec 2018, 20:26
Britons will have to pay €7 every three years to travel to EU countries, as a consequence of Brexit.

The European Commission has confirmed that while UK travellers will not need a visa, they will need to apply for and buy another document.

It is called an ETIAS (European Travel Information and Authorisation System) and although not launched yet, is expected to come into force in 2021.

https://www.bbc.com/news/uk-46564884
On 7th Sept 2018, someone you know wrote this about that Etias:
https://www.aviation24.be/organisations ... egulation/

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Re: Brexit and British Airways, easyJet, Ryanair, et al.

Post by Passenger » 19 Dec 2018, 18:51

Brexit: European Commission implements “no-deal” Contingency Action Plan in specific sectors

The United Kingdom will leave the European Union in 100 days' time. Given the continued uncertainty in the UK surrounding the ratification of the Withdrawal Agreement, as agreed between the EU and the UK on 25 November 2018 – and last week's call by the European Council (Article 50) to intensify preparedness work at all levels and for all outcomes – the European Commission has today (19/12/2018) started implementing its “no deal” Contingency Action Plan. This delivers on the Commission's commitment to adopt all necessary “no deal” proposals by the end of the year, as outlined in its second preparedness Communication of 13 November 2018.

Today's package includes 14 measures in a limited number of areas where a "no-deal" scenario would create major disruption for citizens and businesses in the EU27. These areas include financial services, air transport, customs, and climate policy, amongst others. The Commission considers it essential and urgent to adopt these measures today to ensure that the necessary contingency measures can enter into application on 30 March 2019 in order to limit the most significant damage caused by a "no-deal" scenario in these areas.

These measures will not – and cannot – mitigate the overall impact of a "no-deal" scenario, nor do they in any way compensate for the lack of stakeholder preparedness or replicate the full benefits of EU membership or the terms of any transition period, as provided for in the Withdrawal Agreement. They are limited to specific areas where it is absolutely necessary to protect the vital interests of the EU and where preparedness measures on their own are not sufficient. As a rule, they will be temporary in nature, limited in scope and adopted unilaterally by the EU. They take into account discussions with Member States and are in addition to the preparedness measures that have already been taken, as set out in the two previous preparedness Communications.

The Commission will continue to implement its Contingency Action Plan in the weeks to come and will monitor the need for additional action, as well as continue to support Member States in their preparedness work. The Commission has consistently put citizens first throughout these negotiations and throughout its "no-deal" preparedness and contingency work. Today's Communication invites Member States to take a generous approach to the rights of UK citizens in the EU, provided that this approach is reciprocated by the UK. In particular, Member States should take measures to ensure that UK citizens legally residing in the EU on the date of withdrawal will continue to be considered legal residents. Member States should adopt a pragmatic approach to granting temporary residence status. It is recalled that the Commission has already adopted a proposal for a Regulation which exempts UK nationals from visa requirements, provided that all EU citizens are equally exempt from UK visa requirements. As regards social security coordination, the Commission considers it necessary that Member States take all possible steps to ensure legal certainty and to protect the rights acquired by EU27 citizens and UK nationals who exercised their right to free movement before 30 March 2019.

Sector-specific regulation

Financial services


(...)

Transport

The Commission has today adopted two measures that will avoid full interruption of air traffic between the EU and the UK in the event of no deal. These measures will only ensure basic connectivity and in no means replicate the significant advantages of membership of the Single European Sky. This is subject to the UK conferring equivalent rights to EU air carriers, as well as the UK ensuring conditions of fair competition.
A proposal for a Regulation to ensure temporarily (for 12 months) the provision of certain air services between the UK and the EU. A proposal for a Regulation to extend temporarily (for 9 months) the validity of certain aviation safety licences.

The Commission has also adopted a proposal for a Regulation to allow UK operators to temporarily (nine months) carry goods into the EU, provided the UK confers equivalent rights to EU road haulage operators and subject to fair competition conditions.

Customs and the export of goods

(...)

EU climate policy

(...)


PEACE Programme

(...)

Other

(...)

Next steps

The Commission calls on the European Parliament and the Council to ensure the adoption of the proposed legislative acts so that they are in force by 29 March 2019. The Commission also highlights to the European Parliament and the Council that it is important for delegated acts to enter into force as rapidly as possible. For Delegated Acts, the normal scrutiny period by the European Parliament and Council is, as a rule, two to three months (two months for the Delegated Regulation on summary declarations and pre-departure declarations; three months for the Delegated Regulation on the listing of the UK in EU statistics; a maximum of three months for the Delegated Regulations on certain types of contracts, including over-the-counter derivatives. For more information on the minimum timelines for adoption of such legal acts, see here under Annex 5. Delegated acts can enter into force earlier if the European Parliament and the Council both inform the Commission, before the end of the scrutiny period, that they will not object to the act.

Source - EN:
http://europa.eu/rapid/press-release_IP-18-6851_en.htm

Source - NL:
http://europa.eu/rapid/press-release_IP-18-6851_nl.htm

Source - FR:
http://europa.eu/rapid/press-release_IP-18-6851_fr.htm

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Re: Brexit and British Airways, easyJet, Ryanair, et al.

Post by lumumba » 06 Jan 2019, 01:00

WILL BE ABLE TO FLY?
(and other post-Brexit air travel questions)?

What you need to know about flying between the UK and the EU27 after March 29.

By SAIM SAEED 12/21/18, 4:22 PM CET Updated 1/5/19, 6:32 AM CET

A British Airways plane takes off from Heathrow Airport in England in 2017 | Jack Taylor/Getty Images


The worst-case Brexit scenario for aviation of widespread grounding of flights has been avoided thanks to contingency plans in both London and Brussels.

But everything will not stay the same after the U.K. leaves — especially if the Brexit deal agreed between the U.K. and EU is not signed off on by MPs in Westminster.


Here's what could happen to U.K.-EU flights after Brexit day.

Can I book a flight between the EU and the U.K. after March 30, 2019?

Yes. (Probably.)

The best case scenario for travelers is if the Brexit Withdrawal Agreement negotiated by the EU and U.K. is approved in the British parliament on January 14. If that happens, then air services between the EU and the U.K. will remain the same at least until the end of 2020 (and possibly longer), by which time negotiators hope to have a permanent air transport agreement in place.

The Commission was keen to point out that this is a "bare-bones" agreement.

But the turmoil in the British parliament of late shows the Brexit agreement may not be approved, putting the U.K. on course to crash out of the EU without a deal. The European Commission proposed in December a set of no-deal contingency plans, which if approved by the EU27 will still allow direct flights between the EU and the U.K. for a period of 12 months after March 30. So yes, even in the event of a no-deal Brexit, you will — pending EU27 and European Parliament approval of the Commission's no-deal plans — be able to fly from the EU to the U.K. and the other way round.



So will air transport remain the same?

No.

The Commission is keen to point out that this is a "bare-bones" agreement, and not only is it less than what the U.K. already has, it is also temporary. British airlines will lose the right to operate intra-EU flights. They will also lose the right to operate flights from the U.K. to the EU and then on to another destination — London-Madrid-Buenos Aires, say.

While airlines can continue operating on the routes they already have, they cannot open new routes, so if you were looking forward to that direct flight from Glasgow to Bucharest, airlines will not be able to add it after March 30. Operators also cannot add more flights to existing routes, so if there are two daily flights to Riga from London Gatwick, a third cannot be added.


Passengers at UK airports are set to face disruption in the event of a no-deal Brexit | Jack Taylor/Getty Images


That's bad for connectivity and growth. “This restriction of air connectivity development from a no-deal scenario is a detail that matters. If also applied by the U.K. vis-à-vis EU27 airlines, it would ultimately result in the loss of 140,000 new flights and nearly 20 million passengers on the U.K.-EU27 market," said Olivier Jankovec, director general of ACI Europe .

Do passengers from the U.S. or elsewhere have to worry about Brexit?

Yes.

About half of all passengers traveling to the U.K. from the U.S. go on to other EU countries, meaning that American passengers could face major disruptions and American carriers could lose a lot of business through codeshare agreements. For example, American Airlines and British Airways are part of the Oneworld alliance. American counts on BA's routes in Europe to make sure its passengers can go on to their destinations from Heathrow. The Commission's no-deal plans do not mention how codeshares might continue operating after March 30, which spells trouble for non-Europeans coming in from other countries hoping to move between the EU and the U.K.

Will British passengers need visas to go to the EU and vice-versa?

No.

The Commission has decided to grant U.K. citizens visa-free status, which will allow Britons to stay in the EU for up to 90 days over a 180-day period. That means that British citizens can go on holiday or see friends and family on the Continent, but may need to apply for visas if intending to stay longer than three months. However, U.K. citizens will have to pay a €7 fee under the EU's new European Travel Information and Authorization System, which will screen non-EU travelers who do not require visas before entry.

European citizens may also not need visas to go to the U.K. for short periods, but the British government has proposed a new immigration plan that would put them in the same category as the rest of the world when it comes to applying for jobs or immigration. The plan will likely not come into force until 2025 at the earliest.

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