A fully automatic passenger bridge is on trial at Amsterdam Airport Schiphol

2
563

Amsterdam Airport Schiphol and KLM have commissioned a fully automatic passenger bridge. This innovation allows a dual passenger bridge to connect automatically in under a minute, thereby reducing the waiting time for passengers. The fully automatic bridge also helps to speed up aircraft turnaround times, during which every minute counts. In addition, the likelihood of malfunctions or damage due to operating mistakes is decreased as well.

The fully automatic passenger bridge will be used by KLM and its SkyTeam partners for intercontinental flights departing from Pier F. This automated passenger bridge will be tested in Schiphol’s airport operations until the end of 2019. A decision will then be made on its further roll-out at the airport.

The airport developed the automated passenger bridge in collaboration with bridge supplier CIMC-TianDa, Dutch high-tech firm Sioux-CCM and KLM. This passenger bridge is equipped with a smart technology system, in which cameras on the bridge recognise the door of the aircraft. The bridge can then connect itself to the aircraft door using sensors. A KLM staff member activates the automatic passenger bridge and monitors the process.

I am proud that we are commissioning the world’s first fully automatic dual passenger bridge at Schiphol. We are committed to improving quality through innovation, with the aim of making the airport as comfortable and efficient as possible for passengers and airlines.

Dick Benschop, CEO Royal Schiphol Group

This fully automatic passenger bridge at Schiphol is a wonderful innovation that can really make a difference. We at KLM are proud that we’ve contributed to this development. Because the bridge can connect in less than a minute, our customers can enjoy shorter waiting times. This innovation also increases our punctuality and reduces the likelihood of malfunctions. These benefits will result in an even better customer experience.

René de Groot, Managing Director and Chief Operating Officer of KLM
24 September 2019
We earlier reported that this was the world’s first automatic bridge, but it seems that Wellington (New Zealand) installed one already 12 months ago (see comment hereunder).

2 COMMENTS

LEAVE A REPLY

Please enter your comment!
Please enter your name here

This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.